USA: ‘Meet a Muslim Day’ in Seattle a chance to display true face of Islam, young men say

Ahmad Bilal, Faiez Ahmad and Luqman Munir couldn’t have been better positioned to talk about being Muslims than the cultural crossroads of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street in downtown Seattle on Saturday.

The trio, all members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association, took part in the organization’s “Meet a Muslim Day,” an effort in cities around the country to dispel myths about Islam and put a human face on a population that’s been the subject of stereotypes, public suspicion and in extreme cases, threats and violence.

For three hours on a showery Saturday, the men stood among the throngs of tourists and St. Patrick’s Day parade spectators at a corner of Fourth and Pine with a sign that read, “I am a Muslim: Ask me anything.”

Young Muslims with similar signs fielded questions at Seattle’s Green Lake, University District and Pike Place Market, too.

At Westlake, 30 or 40 people stopped by to speak with Bilal, Ahmad and Munir, including people who’d come for the parade, making for a vivid, impromptu cultural exchange.

The men showed off mobile-phone pictures of them posing with smiling, green-clad parade revelers.

They said they even had a productive discussion about Islam and Christianity with a man standing a few feet away holding a sign imploring onlookers to “repent and believe the gospel” of Jesus Christ.

“He gave us some knowledge and we gave him some knowledge,” said Bilal, a 20-year-old student at South Seattle College.

They invited the man to visit their mosque. He agreed to come, Bilal said.

While concerns about Islamophobia and the need for greater Muslim outreach have run high since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the controversy over President Donald Trump’s original and recently revised restrictions on certain Muslim immigrants and refugees gave those issues new urgency.

Violence and threats with religious overtones have become a pressing issue for other faiths, too. A spike in threats and incidents involving Jewish community centers, synagogues and cemeteries has put the nation’s Jewish community on edge.

In Kent, police are searching for a suspect who shot a Sikh man in what’s being investigated as a possible bias or hate crime, and in Kansas, two Indian computer engineers were shot by a gunman who yelled “get out of my country.” One of the victims in that shooting died.

Recent studies by the Pew Research Center show that most Americans don’t personally know a Muslim and that Americans are generally “cooler” toward Islam than other religious faiths. But getting to know someone who is Muslim leads to warmer feelings and more positive attitudes, their research suggests.

For Bilal, Ahmad and Munir, participating in Saturday’s event served as an opportunity to show that true Islam is about people like them, not the violent extremists who tend to capture headlines.

“I’m here to say that our religion is for peace; Islam is for peace,” Bilal said.

The men’s bold act comes on the heels of a visit to that very intersection in February by U.S. Marine and Muslim-American Mansoor Shams, who traveled the country with his own “Ask me anything” sign to encourage conversation about Islam with non-Muslims.

Bilal, who is Pakistani, said he lives with a host family in Seattle that once harbored negative attitudes about Islam, but having contact with him has changed their views.

The men know they won’t be able to end Islamophobia by themselves, but Munir is optimistic that events like Meet a Muslim Day will make a difference.

“Time heals,” he said. “We’ve just got to stick with our message.”

The men’s provocative sign asked passers-by to “ask me anything,” which might have led to some pretty awkward conversations. But most people simply expressed support rather than take them up on that offer.

“One lady asked me, ‘Do you want a hug?’” said Munir, a 25-year-old recent engineering grad. He said yes and the woman gave him a warm embrace.

Earlier, as Bilal walked to Westlake, a different woman who noticed the sign called out “I love you,” so Bilal shouted “I love you back.”

“Most people don’t care about religion,” Bilal said, recalling the encounter. “They care about peace.”

USA: Americans Rate Jews Highest, Muslims Lowest On ‘Feeling Thermometer’

A recent HuffPost/YouGov poll found that just 28 percent of Americans hold very or somewhat favorable views of Islam, while 48 percent hold very or somewhat unfavorable views of the faith.

A new survey asked Americans to rate different religious groups on a “feeling thermometer” from zero to 100. The results revealed that Americans are warming up to people to different faiths.

The survey, released Wednesday by Pew Research Center, found that Americans rate Jews the warmest and Muslims the coolest. Pew surveyed 4,248 adults between Jan. 9 and 23, 2017, and found that Jews got an average rating of 67 degrees, while Muslims came in at just 48 degrees.

Across the board, though, Americans feel increasingly positive toward a range of religious groups. Pew compared the results of the study with those of a previous poll conducted in 2014, and almost every religious group received a higher thermometer rating in the second survey.

”One of the really interesting things was that the increasingly warm feelings we see for these groups is so broad based,” Jessica Martinez, lead researcher for the study, told The Huffington Post. “There’s increasing warmth in the way religious groups view each other and in the way Democrats and Republicans view different groups. Even though there are differences, generally both view most of the groups more warmly than they did before.”

Thermometer ratings for Jews rose from 63 degrees to 67 degrees. Muslims received a rating of 48 degrees, up from 40 degrees in 2014. Ratings for Catholics, Buddhists, Hindus, Mormons and atheists also rose. The biggest increase in “temperature” occurred for atheists, whose rating rose from 41 degrees to 50 degrees.

Americans, on average, continue to treat Muslims with hostility. A recent HuffPost/YouGov poll found that just 28 percent of Americans hold very or somewhat favorable views of Islam, while 48 percent hold very or somewhat unfavorable views of the faith.

Among different demographic groups, however, views of Muslims and Islam vary significantly. HuffPost’s poll revealed a 29-point gap between Republicans and Democrats who view Islam favorably ― at 15 percent and 44 percent, respectively.

USA: Ahmadiyyas, Baitul Hameed Mosque recognized at Los Angeles County Board Meeting

Supervisor Hilda H. Solis introduced Imam Mohammed Zafarullah and the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and commanded the community and Imam Zafarullah for the humanitarian and social services.

Los Angeles County held its annual board meeting on February 14, 2017, at their offices in Los Angeles where Ms. Hilda H. Solis, supervisor of the 1st District, invited Imam Mohammed Zafarullah to be recognized for the humanitarian services rendered by the Ahmadiyya Muslim community.
Imam Mohammed Zafarullah, who serves as the regional missionary for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community USA’s Southwest Region, was accompanied by Mr Qadir Malik from Baitul Hameed Mosque..lacounty-certificate-2
Supervisor Hilda H. Solis briefly introduced Imam Mohammed Zafarullah and the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and commanded the community and Imam Zafarullah for their humanitarian and social services provided locally, nationally, and internationally.

Imam Zafarullah was invited to address the Board and attendees of the meeting.
Imam Zafarullah detailed the work community is carrying-out all over the world in healthcare, education, and disaster relief services fields, especially in the remote regions of the world. Imam told the audience how the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is helping by opening schools, colleges, and hospitals in very poor regions of Africa and providing the public with clean drinking water also.
Locally, in Los Angeles area, the community is helping the poor and the needy by providing lunch boxes every weekend, the Imam said. Local Ahmadiyya chapters are also helping the needy by distributing blankets and providing other day-to-day requirements.
At the end of his address, the Imam displayed the sticker with the slogan “Love For All Hatred For None”.
The book,“World Crisis And Pathway To Peace” by Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, the world head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, was presented to the Board Director, the Supervisor, and several other members of the Board.

USA: Albany Ahmadiyya Muslim community dialogue aims to combat stereotypes about Islam

USA: Albany Ahmadiyya Muslim community dialogue aims to combat stereotypes about Islam

“The faith has been hijacked by the extremists. And we want to take it back. And basically tell that the Islamic faith has nothing to do with terrorism or violence

AMSTERDAM — “The understanding of the Muslim faith is not so good in the eyes of Americans,” said Dr. Hafeez Rehman, President of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Albany Chapter.

For more than a month Muslim community leaders have been holding weekly discussions about their faith at Fresh Basil in Amsterdam.

People of different religions and ethnicities also come.

“I try to tell them that we are actually really peaceful and I tell them like what we do and that we go to the mosque on Sundays and we learned that it’s really not as bad as people think,” said Soha Mahmood.

“I do have an understanding that the Bible and the Quran have similar teachings of values that we share and that’s how I see Islam,” said Amsterdam resident Maria Roman.

Organizers belong to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, which is one of more than 70 sects of Islam.

Dr. Rehman says they are trying to combat stereotypes about Muslims.

“The faith has been hijacked by the extremists,” Dr. Rehman said. “And we want to take it back. And basically tell that the Islamic faith has nothing to do with terrorism or violence,” he said.

Dr. Rehman said the international organization has held similar campaigns since September 11th.

However, issues including extremism and political tensions inspired the “Coffee, Cake and True Islam discussions.

“After I met a couple of Muslims and a couple of…and you just see that they are normal people,” said Amsterdam resident Zuzana Duffy.

74 of the organization’s chapters nationwide are holding similar events.

Noah Ahmad Quick, who was raised as a Catholic and converted to Islam in 2005, is part of a delegation addressing of members of Congress on Capitol Hill Friday, including Rep. Paul Tonko (D-Amsterdam).

“Our goal is to build bridges not to divide people but to bring people together under one comment card,” Quick said. “And that’s to serve humanity,” he said.

Kellianne Kennedy of Glens Falls, who is catholic, said the talks have changed her perception of Islam.

“I’ve only seen the Muslims on TV which are portrayed as terrorists and evil people,” Kennedy said. “Totally a 180. They are the most peaceful calm people,” she said.

The group will launch the discussions in Glens Falls and Albany next week.

They plan to hold the talks at least through the spring.

USA: Ahmadiyya Muslims hold Interfaith Prayer Service at mosque in Chicago’s Glen Ellyn area

Imam Shamshad and Yasir Malik president of the south west chapter of Chicago welcomed the gathering and expressed their gratitude to each of the guests for their overwhelming support.

“We Are Proud Of Our Neighbors” — Imam Shamshad of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.

Pastor Scott of United Methodist Church, Glen Ellyn had reached out to Imam Shamshad earlier in the week and raised his concerns about the recent situations about Muslims in the Unites States. He promised to support and stand beside Muslims in such hardship and asked Imam Shamshad if he could help us in anyway. To his offer, Imam Shamshad suggested to hold an Interfaith Prayer Service in Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque in Glen Ellyn Chicago area,and invited the Pastor and  his congregation. He also invited other religious leaders from around Glen Ellyn.
ahmediyya news
On Thursday, February 2, 2017, an Interfaith Prayer Service was held by Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Masjid Bait-ul-Jaamay, Glen Ellyn. Around 50 Guests belonging to different faiths attended the Prayer Service and promised to provide their support in whichever manner they could.

Imam Shamshad and Yasir Malik president of the south west chapter of Chicago welcomed the gathering and expressed their gratitude to each of the guests for their overwhelming support. Later Imam Shamshad addressed them and said, Islam teaches every Muslim to obey the laws of the Country they live in and accept their authority.

He mentioned a Quranic verse which says:

“O ye who believe! obey Allah, and obey His Messenger and those who are in authority among you. ” — (4:60)

As per this verse, all the Muslims are bound to follow their Authorities even if they are not Muslims.
irabwah news
Imam shamshad also quoted a statement of the Worldwide Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, His Holiness Hadhrath Mirza Masroor Ahmad which he made on October 13,2015:

“All genuine refugees should be helped by Governments and International Organizations. They should be allowed to settle until peace is restored in their home countries. However, it is also important that the Authorities remain vigilant and monitor the refugees to ensure that extremists are not allowed to settle under the guise of asylum.”

Pastor Scott of united Church of Christ was the first speaker who express his feelings and thoughts about current conditions of the Muslims in the country and lead the prayers. Pastor Hong-Kien Jeremiah Lee of united Methodist church  and other religious leaders and their congregations also spoke and prayed. They addressed the gathering and expressed their concerns and promised to provide their complete support in order to promote peace, harmony and brotherhood among the society. Prayers were offered together by all the attendees. Imam Shamshad and  members of Ahmadiyya Muslim congregation thanked all the guests of their unconditional help.

Six copies of the Holy Qur’an with English Translation and other literatures ,Muslim Sunrise, True Islam, Message of Peace, Muslims for Life, Muslims for Loyalty were freely distributed among the Guests. Refreshments were served to all.

USA: Ahmadiyya Muslim Imam joins interfaith leaders at Thanksgiving event in Claremont, California

USA: Ahmadiyya Muslim Imam joins interfaith leaders at Thanksgiving event in Claremont, California

A youth group from the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community sang a song in Urdu language, which was translated and printed in English for the audience.

Imam Mohammed Zafarullah Hanjra represented the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community’s Baitul Hameed Mosque in Chino, CA, at an interfaith Thanksgiving event held on Wed., Nov. 23rd at 7pm in Claremont.

Other spiritual traditions were represented by faith leaders from the Jewish, Christian and Native American communities. The program was sponsored by the Claremont Interfaith Council (CIC) and hosted by the Claremont Presbyterian Church.

Following a welcome address and reading of the CIC’s “Statement of Understanding” by CIC president Rev. Lara Martin, Claremont Presbyterian’s Rev. Krista Wuertz led an audience-participation prayer entitled “A Litany of Thanksgiving” that highlighted the many reasons and blessings we have to be thankful to God for in our daily lives.

This was followed by a Native American Prayer song led by Alfonso Villanueva, a Purepecha Elder, Chief Tony Cerda, Costanoan Rumsen, and Trevor Thomson, a Yurok Elder.
A Thanksgiving Proclamation, read by Claremont Mayor pro-tem Larry Schroeder, was followed by readings on the topic of “Thankfulness to God” from the sacred texts of the three Semitic religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

Cantor Paul Buch read in Hebrew from the Torah, Rev. George Silides read Luke 12:16-31 from the New Testament, and Imam Zafarullah from the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community’s Baitul Hameed Mosque in Chino read 14:8 and 46:16 from the Holy Quran.

Imam Zafarullah also quoted a saying (hadith) of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) that stated: “If one is not grateful to people, one cannot be grateful to God.”

The Imam closed his remarks by saying that God instructs us to be ever-thankful to God for our blessings because all of our blessings ultimately come from God.

A youth group from the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community sang a song in Urdu language, which was translated and printed in English for the audience.

More sacred readings were read out by Rev. Jan Chase from Unity Church in Pomona and by a representative of the Mormon LDS Church. A combined Church choir then presented “A Song of Thanks to the Lord” followed by “A Thanksgiving Message” from Rev. Joel Fairley from Claremont’s First Baptist Church.

The Rev. Mark Wiley from Claremont’s United Methodist Church then delivered a Thanksgiving Prayer.

The event was concluded with a collection of a Thanksgiving Offering and its blessing by Rev. Dong-woo Lee, followed by a congregational song entitled “The Right Hand of God.”

— USA: Ahmadiyya Muslim Imam joins interfaith leaders at Thanksgiving event in Claremont, California

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

India: Derwaish Umar Din Khan of Qadian passes away in California, USA

India: Derwaish Umar Din Khan of Qadian passes away in California, USA

Derwaish Din setteled in Qadian as a teenage volunteer nearly seven decades ago at the call of the then spiritual head, Khalifa, of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, Hazrat Mirza Bashsir-ud-Din Mahmood Ahmad

‘A special group of elders of the community, they were affectionately called Darw.aish, a tile that signified their sense of selflessness.’

Qadian: Derwaish Umar Din Khan passed away this morning in Fresno, California, it has been reported. He was 96 years old.

His body will be taken to Qadian for burial per his will, it is announced by the family

Derwaish Din setteled in Qadian as a teenage volunteer nearly seven decades ago at the call of the then spiritual head, Khalifa, of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, Hazrat Mirza Bashsir-ud-Din Mahmood Ahmad, for the protections of Ahmadi families and the holy places of the community.

the leadership and a majority of the members of the Ahmadiyya Jama’at Qadian migrated to Pakistan at the time of Indo-Pak partition in 1947, the volunteers who stayed back at the directions of their spiritual leader – 313 in number – came to be revered as a special group of elders of the community and Hazrat Ahmad affectionately called them Darwaish, a tile that signified their sense of selflessness.

Umer Din Khan Derwaish served the community for a long time in Sadr Anjuman Ahmadiyya, the Ahmadiyya administrative body, in Qadian.

He will be buried in the special section devoted to ‘Derwaishan-e Qadian’ at Bahishti Maqbra in Qadian.

– India: Derwaish Umar Din Khan of Qadian passes away in California, USA

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

USA: 3 California mosques receive letters threatening Muslims

USA: 3 California mosques receive letters threatening Muslims

The letter was addressed to “the children of Satan” and it was signed by “American for A Better Way.” The L.A. area mosques received it Wednesday and the San Jose mosque on Thursday.

A civil rights group has called for more police protection of mosques after several in California received letters that praised President-elect Donald Trump and threatened Muslim genocide.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations, or CAIR, said the same handwritten, photocopied letter was sent last week to the Islamic Center of Long Beach, the Islamic Center of Claremont and the Evergreen Islamic Center in San Jose, the Los Angeles Times reported Saturday.

The letter was addressed to “the children of Satan” and it was signed by “American for A Better Way.” The L.A. area mosques received it Wednesday and the San Jose mosque on Thursday.

“There’s a new sheriff in town — President Donald Trump. He’s going to cleanse America and make it shine again. And, he’s going to start with you Muslims,” the letter states, according to CAIR. “And, he’s going to do to you Muslims what Hitler did to the jews (sic).”

[More …]

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This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

USA: Middletown-area Ahmadiyya Muslim Americans offer message of love, understanding

 

USA: Middletown-area Ahmadiyya Muslim Americans offer message of love, understanding

“We want to say, don’t be afraid to come here. Friends are coming to the mosque Friday to talk about Thanksgiving and about what they appreciate, what they are grateful for.”

In our rapidly accelerating culture, taking a moment to reflect peacefully sometimes seems impossible. Thankfully, the grateful Thanksgiving tradition continues to offer space to reflect on our shared national values, regardless of class, creed, race, gender or orientation.

“Love for all, hate for none,” is the message shared by Middletown resident Miyan Zahir Muhammad Mannan, director of Outreach for the Baitul Aman, the Meriden-based “House of Peace” mosque. Established in the 1980s by Zahir’s father, Miyan Manzur-ul-Mannan, the Connecticut chapter of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community preaches a “jihad of peace, of love, of understanding,” said Muhammad Mannan.

“Both the Holy Quran and the U.S. Constitution teach sanctity of each and every life irrespective,” added Muhammad Mannan, who follows teachings of an Islamic sect founded in 1889 by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, considered the messiah by his followers. Ahmad set in motion a nonviolent “jihad of the pen,” Muhammad Mannan said.

The belief that Ahmad is the messiah is considered heresy by other Muslim sects who persecute believers, Muhammad Mannan said.

After the shooting last year by mosque neighbor Ted Hakey Jr., who drunkenly fired shots into the unoccupied Meriden mosque on the night of the deadly November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris, a positive series of events put the mosque in a stronger, more visible, positive place in community than ever before, Muhammad Mannon said.

As the first-year anniversary of the mosque shooting passes, members reflect on this “blessing in disguise” that managed to change the hearts and minds of many, including the shooter, who quickly apologized, Muhammand Mannon said.

The tragic event amplified a message of love rather than fear or hate, and a narrative that proves love triumphs over hate, he said.

“We know we can impact our neighbors with true love,” said Talhaht Mannan.

“With all the people rising up in support, it showed us we have strong community,” said Muhammad Mannon, who has since become a relied-upon media source representing views of Muslim Americans. “It gave us a chance to tell who we are and it did wake us up to the idea that maybe we need to reach out to our neighbors and let them know who we really are.”

When President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November, the year was 1863 when Americans were engaged in a Civil War. Today, our country’s differences continue to divide us, with a political electorate offering polarized response to calls to build a fence where others prefer a bridge, to threats of deporting millions of undocumented immigrants or the suggestion of creating a registry that singles out Muslim Americans.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness,” according to the text of the U.S. Constitution and its amendments.

“Prophet Muhammad said 1,300 years ago that love and loyalty to your country are a part of faith,” said Muhammad Mannan, who seeks to understand others better too. The mosque regularly reaches out to support the vulnerable and marginalized members of the community, offering regular food and blood drives, providing a monthly breakfast to the homeless shelter, and more.

Each Friday at 8 p.m., the community is invited for “Coffee, Cake & True Islam” a discussion held at the Meriden mosque, located at 410 Main St. New themes and topics will be discussed.

“We want to say, don’t be afraid to come here,” said Muhammad Mannon. “Friends are coming to the mosque Friday to talk about Thanksgiving and about what they appreciate, what they are grateful for.”

The talk is intended to bring together local citizens to break down cultural barriers and create understanding and respect.

Thanksgiving is “a wonderful holiday that gives families the opportunity to be together,” said Talhaht Mannan, Muhammad Mannon’s mother, the preschool director at Central Connecticut State University. Talhaht Mannan also is a past president of the mosque’s women’s auxiliary and a board member. “In America, we are thankful that we can practice our religion.”

“Coffee, cake & True Islam” on Fridays offers a space for the public to meet a “peace loving Muslim,” said Muhammad Mannon, with a smile and a twinkle in his eye. “We all are human and we all deserve love.”

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USA: NAACP Issues Statement on Proposed ‘Muslim Registry’

USA: NAACP Issues Statement on Proposed ‘Muslim Registry’

For democracy to become real for all members of our nation, we all must learn to stand in solidarity with any subjugated groups and embrace the risks of doing so. 

BALTIMORE, MD. – The following is a statement from Cornell William Brooks, President and CEO of the NAACP:

“The NAACP resolutely condemns President-elect Trump’s proposed plans for a ‘Muslim registry.’

Our nation’s history contains far too many horrific examples of the oppression and demonization of groups based on religion, race, origin or political affiliation, and we refuse to sit by silently and allow for the creation of new ones.

The President-elect may have run a campaign based on the faulty assumption that only through a return to the racialized polarization of the past can America be great again, but those of us who know our history and have a memory of that ugly past will fight with every inch of our spirit to not go back.

While slavery, genocide, segregation and internment have strained our ideals of democracy and inclusion, those same ideals yet inspire the NAACP’s work in streets, media and courts.

For over a century, the NAACP has battled against racism to secure equality for all American citizens. President-elect Trump’s proposed registry – a digital ‘stop and frisk’ for Muslim Americans – is the latest threat to the liberty of all Americans. The NAACP stands with our civil rights organization partners in denouncing any ‘Muslim registry’ and in the ongoing fight against the persecution of any Americans.

For democracy to become real for all members of our nation, we all must learn to stand in solidarity with any subjugated groups and embrace the risks of doing so.

That is why I, as a proud Christian and card-carrying member of the NAACP, have joined with my dear Jewish colleague, Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, in vowing that, should President-elect Trump’s threat of a ‘Muslim registry’ come to fruition, we will not hesitate to sign up. In the meantime, the NAACP will continue to stand in staunch opposition to any attempt to register and reduce anyone to noncitizen and nonhuman status.”

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Founded Feb. 12. 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest, largest and most widely recognized grassroots–based civil rights organization. Its more than half-million members and supporters throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.

Read original post here: USA: NAACP Issues Statement on Proposed ‘Muslim Registry’

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.