USA: Ahmadiyya Muslim group builds understanding over coffee in Austin, Round Rock

Seated in a booth at a Round Rock cafe on a recent Wednesday, Susan Sneller asked the question she’d always wondered about the headscarf, or hijab, that some women wear.

“Don’t you get hot in the summer wearing something on your head all day?” Sneller, who had never met anyone of the Muslim faith, asked Nadia Ahmad. “I want to take everything off and fan myself in summer in Texas.”

But Ahmad welcomed the question. In the summer, Ahmad explained, she wears clothing made of lighter weight material with good ventilation. “Don’t worry; we’re fine. We’re not forcing ourselves,” she said with a laugh.

It’s exactly this kind of learning and relationship-building that Ahmad and other members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community of Austin had in mind when the group began holding “Coffee, Cake and True Islam” events on Wednesdays at coffee shops in Austin and Round Rock. The events, which have been featured by KUT and other media outlets, and others like them are being held by chapters throughout the country.

Their message? “We are here to stay and we are your neighbors; come talk to us,” Ahmad said.

Arif Mirza is director of outreach for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community of Austin, which has a mosque in Round Rock and draws members from as far away as San Antonio. He points to a recent statistic: Just 38 percent of Americans say they know someone who is Muslim, according to a 2014 Pew Research Center survey. And even if they do, he said, they might not feel comfortable sharing their curiosities with that person.

“The idea is to give Americans who otherwise do not know a Muslim a chance to come in and ask any questions they might have about Islam,” Mirza said. “We’re hoping that in the long term we can bring about a change in attitude that is going to last.”

The same Pew survey showed that 41 percent of Americans view Muslims more coldly than warmly. And hate crimes against Muslims are on the rise. Last year, the number of physical assaults against Muslims in the United States reached 9/11-era levels, according to hate crimes statistics from the FBI.

At first, Mirza said, he worried about the potential backlash of putting on such an event, but he turned out to be “pleasantly surprised” by its positive reception.

Mirza recalled that once, a woman who was offended by the event accidentally called him to complain, thinking she was contacting the owner of the coffee shop. Once he told her who he was, however, the two ended up talking for 20 minutes, and the woman changed her tune, saying she’d like to meet him for coffee some time.

“Having that one-on-one conversation with somebody and getting to know that they have similar struggles in life and they probably feel the same way about things that you do, it has a way of affecting people that watching something on TV or somebody giving a lecture just doesn’t,” Mirza said.

In one of Wednesday’s small group conversations, Deborah Harris asked Touba Khurshid and Aziza Faruqi why they wanted to participate in the event. Khurshid, who had spent years living in London, told a story about going to South Dakota for the first time and noticing that people were staring at her.

“I remember all the looks that I was getting, and that was the first time I was like ‘Oh my gosh.’ I had never thought that I would get such curious looks as if they hadn’t seen a woman with a scarf,” Khurshid said. “It kind of made me realize there’s a big need for people to know about Islam.”

Contrary to that experience, Faruqi said she has never felt out of place during her 25 years in the U.S. because embracing differences is what America is about.

“That’s the America that we live in. That’s what we cherish,” Faruqi said. “So what disturbs us is the fact that living in such a multicultural, multireligion country, how can people still have fear of one faith or unwillingness to learn about other faiths?”

Faruqi said she wished more people outside of these events would feel free to ask her questions about Islam.

At the events, Mirza said questions range from personal (“How did you learn about Islam?”) to theological (“What does Islam say about God?”) to political (“How do you feel about President Donald Trump’s travel ban?”).

Politics and the new administration are what drew Sneller and Austin couple Jack and Barbara Bresette-Mills to recent coffee shop events. All are part of Indivisible, a national anti-Trump network with Austin origins.

“Because of this election, we both feel we have to stand up for people of color and minorities,” Jack Bresette-Mills said. “It seems to be a racist move in our government.”

“A lot of people have been cut down, and horrible things were said the whole campaign about all different kinds of people, be it women, be it Muslims, be it African-Americans, be it indigenous,” Barbara Bresette-Mills said.

“It’s simply wrong. It’s not American. (To be) American (means) everybody’s welcome,” Jack Bresette-Mills said.

On a basic level, he said, just as the members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community came to show them that not all Muslims are terrorists, he and his wife came to show them that not all non-Muslims are Islamophobic.

“We also just like to meet people,” Barbara Bresette-Mills said. “And I feel like that’s the best way to change things is to have human interaction. Talk to each other.”

At one point in the conversation with Ahmad and another woman, Maliah Ahmed, Sneller asked them what they would say if they could talk to Trump.

“We would invite him to ‘Coffee, Cake and True Islam,’” Ahmad said. The group laughed.

If you go

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community of Austin hosts “Coffee, Cake and True Islam” events from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesdays at two locations:

• Caffe Medici at 2222 Guadalupe St. in Austin

• Corner Bakery Cafe at 110 N. Interstate 35 in Round Rock

Source :http://www.mystatesman.com/

India: Masngalore Ahmadiyyas stage faith outreach effort to promote True Islam

Ahmadiyya, a reformist sect of Islam, was founded by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian in Punjab, India. Hazarat Ahmad, who claimed to be the promised reformer awaited by many religions in the latter days.

Ahmadiyya Muslim community’s Mangalore Chapter in Karnataka, India, organized a faith outreach event to propagate the peaceful message of Islam-Ahmadiyya in Udupi, a costal city, 65 kilometers from Mangalore, and in Manipal, a suburb within the city of Udupi.

On February 19, 2017, a team of ten volunteers, under the leadership of their local president, Muhammad Yusuf, were joined by vice president B.S. Abdurrahim; Ahmadiyya Imam, Molvi Asif Ahmad Khadim; and the youth leader, M. Abdus Salam from the Mangalore Mosque in the leafleting project. rabwah news1

The volunteers distributed more than 700 leaflets and pamphlets to the general public at the two locations.

madiyya, a reformist sect of Islam, was founded by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian in Punjab, India. Hazarat Ahmad, who claimed to be the promised reformer awaited by many religions in the latter days.

Ahmadiyya doctrine rejects violence in all forms and promotes a peaceful existence according to the laws of the land wherever people happen to live.

_______________________________
With files form V. A. Rashied, Secretary Dawat-e-ilallah, Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamaat, Mangalore

— India: Ahmadiyyas in Mangalore stage faith outreach effort to promote True Islam

USA: Albany Ahmadiyya Muslim community dialogue aims to combat stereotypes about Islam

USA: Albany Ahmadiyya Muslim community dialogue aims to combat stereotypes about Islam

“The faith has been hijacked by the extremists. And we want to take it back. And basically tell that the Islamic faith has nothing to do with terrorism or violence

AMSTERDAM — “The understanding of the Muslim faith is not so good in the eyes of Americans,” said Dr. Hafeez Rehman, President of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Albany Chapter.

For more than a month Muslim community leaders have been holding weekly discussions about their faith at Fresh Basil in Amsterdam.

People of different religions and ethnicities also come.

“I try to tell them that we are actually really peaceful and I tell them like what we do and that we go to the mosque on Sundays and we learned that it’s really not as bad as people think,” said Soha Mahmood.

“I do have an understanding that the Bible and the Quran have similar teachings of values that we share and that’s how I see Islam,” said Amsterdam resident Maria Roman.

Organizers belong to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, which is one of more than 70 sects of Islam.

Dr. Rehman says they are trying to combat stereotypes about Muslims.

“The faith has been hijacked by the extremists,” Dr. Rehman said. “And we want to take it back. And basically tell that the Islamic faith has nothing to do with terrorism or violence,” he said.

Dr. Rehman said the international organization has held similar campaigns since September 11th.

However, issues including extremism and political tensions inspired the “Coffee, Cake and True Islam discussions.

“After I met a couple of Muslims and a couple of…and you just see that they are normal people,” said Amsterdam resident Zuzana Duffy.

74 of the organization’s chapters nationwide are holding similar events.

Noah Ahmad Quick, who was raised as a Catholic and converted to Islam in 2005, is part of a delegation addressing of members of Congress on Capitol Hill Friday, including Rep. Paul Tonko (D-Amsterdam).

“Our goal is to build bridges not to divide people but to bring people together under one comment card,” Quick said. “And that’s to serve humanity,” he said.

Kellianne Kennedy of Glens Falls, who is catholic, said the talks have changed her perception of Islam.

“I’ve only seen the Muslims on TV which are portrayed as terrorists and evil people,” Kennedy said. “Totally a 180. They are the most peaceful calm people,” she said.

The group will launch the discussions in Glens Falls and Albany next week.

They plan to hold the talks at least through the spring.

Halesowen’s Ahmadiyya Muslim Community to host peace exhibition in Hagley to counter extremist rhetoric

The event will start with a presentation on the history of the UK’s Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, whose motto is “love for all, hatred for none”.

One of Britain’s oldest Muslim communities is to host a peace exhibition in Hagley as part of a new campaign to counter extremist rhetoric and drive home a message of peace.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community based in Halesowen is organising the exhibition which will take place at Hagley Community Centre, Worcester Road, on February 18 from 10am until noon.

The event, part of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community’s United Against Extremism campaign, follows a similar event held in Kinver last year.Halesowen Peace exhibition-2016-2

Mubashir Nadeem, president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim elders association, said: “As a Muslim community, we believe it is our duty to serve this country and to stop extremism, particularly in the name of Islam, which teaches us peace, loyalty, freedom, equality, respect and love for all.

“We stand united with all who oppose extremists because our strength stems from our unity.

“The campaign will send a clear message that IS has nothing to do with Islam and that extremism will never succeed.

“The campaign will also see the distribution of half a million leaflets across the UK, to highlight Islam’s rejection of extremism and its emphasis on peace.”

The event will start with a presentation on the history of the UK’s Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, whose motto is “love for all, hatred for none”.

Displays promoting peace with translated excerpts of Qu’ranic verses along with other literature can also be seen.

To find out more about the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community’s work for community cohesion visit http://www.UnitedAgainstExtremism.com and loveforallhatredfornone.org

 

Source http://www.stourbridgenews.co.uk

USA: Ahmadiyya Muslims hold Interfaith Prayer Service at mosque in Chicago’s Glen Ellyn area

Imam Shamshad and Yasir Malik president of the south west chapter of Chicago welcomed the gathering and expressed their gratitude to each of the guests for their overwhelming support.

“We Are Proud Of Our Neighbors” — Imam Shamshad of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.

Pastor Scott of United Methodist Church, Glen Ellyn had reached out to Imam Shamshad earlier in the week and raised his concerns about the recent situations about Muslims in the Unites States. He promised to support and stand beside Muslims in such hardship and asked Imam Shamshad if he could help us in anyway. To his offer, Imam Shamshad suggested to hold an Interfaith Prayer Service in Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosque in Glen Ellyn Chicago area,and invited the Pastor and  his congregation. He also invited other religious leaders from around Glen Ellyn.
ahmediyya news
On Thursday, February 2, 2017, an Interfaith Prayer Service was held by Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Masjid Bait-ul-Jaamay, Glen Ellyn. Around 50 Guests belonging to different faiths attended the Prayer Service and promised to provide their support in whichever manner they could.

Imam Shamshad and Yasir Malik president of the south west chapter of Chicago welcomed the gathering and expressed their gratitude to each of the guests for their overwhelming support. Later Imam Shamshad addressed them and said, Islam teaches every Muslim to obey the laws of the Country they live in and accept their authority.

He mentioned a Quranic verse which says:

“O ye who believe! obey Allah, and obey His Messenger and those who are in authority among you. ” — (4:60)

As per this verse, all the Muslims are bound to follow their Authorities even if they are not Muslims.
irabwah news
Imam shamshad also quoted a statement of the Worldwide Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, His Holiness Hadhrath Mirza Masroor Ahmad which he made on October 13,2015:

“All genuine refugees should be helped by Governments and International Organizations. They should be allowed to settle until peace is restored in their home countries. However, it is also important that the Authorities remain vigilant and monitor the refugees to ensure that extremists are not allowed to settle under the guise of asylum.”

Pastor Scott of united Church of Christ was the first speaker who express his feelings and thoughts about current conditions of the Muslims in the country and lead the prayers. Pastor Hong-Kien Jeremiah Lee of united Methodist church  and other religious leaders and their congregations also spoke and prayed. They addressed the gathering and expressed their concerns and promised to provide their complete support in order to promote peace, harmony and brotherhood among the society. Prayers were offered together by all the attendees. Imam Shamshad and  members of Ahmadiyya Muslim congregation thanked all the guests of their unconditional help.

Six copies of the Holy Qur’an with English Translation and other literatures ,Muslim Sunrise, True Islam, Message of Peace, Muslims for Life, Muslims for Loyalty were freely distributed among the Guests. Refreshments were served to all.

inaugurates the Baitul Ehsan Mosque

Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Inaugurates New Mosque in Mitcham, London

Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Inaugurates New Mosque in Mitcham, London

The local Ahmadi Muslims must fulfil the rights of their neighbours and inform the local people about the true peaceful teachings of Islam so that any fears or misconceptions that they may hold about Islam are removed.

Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad inaugurates the Baitul Ehsan Mosque

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is pleased to announce that on 7 January 2017, the World Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, the Fifth Khalifa (Caliph), His Holiness, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad inaugurated the Baitul Ehsan Mosque in Mitcham, London.

Upon arrival, His Holiness officially inaugurated the Mosque by unveiling a commemorative plaque and offering a silent prayer in thanks to God Almighty.

His Holiness then delivered an address to the local Ahmadi Muslims gathered at the event.

 Baitul Ehsan Mosque UK

Baitul Ehsan Mosque

Speaking about the true purpose of a Mosque, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad said:

“The purpose of a Mosque is to worship the One God, and so all those who come to worship in this Mosque should seek to fulfil this objective. Thus, Ahmadi Muslims should always pay full attention towards worship and fulfilling the obligations owed to God Almighty.”

His Holiness continued:

“As a result of building this Mosque, the local community will become more aware of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. Hence, the local Ahmadi Muslims must fulfil the rights of their neighbours and inform the local people about the true peaceful teachings of Islam so that any fears or misconceptions that they may hold about Islam are removed. May Allah enable you all to do this.”

After his address, His Holiness led the Zuhr and Asr prayers at the Mosque and inspected various facilities of the Mosque.

In addition to the prayer halls, the five-story building holds conference rooms, offices and various other facilities

Source:. http://timesofahmad.blogspot.com/2017/01/uk-head-of-ahmadiyya-muslim-community.html

Pakistan: QAU Physics Center renamed after Ahmadiyya Nobel laureate Dr Abdus Salam

Pakistan: QAU Physics Center renamed after Ahmadiyya Nobel laureate Dr Abdus Salam

 

Salam shared the 1979 Nobel Prize in Physics for his contribution in the field of physics and become the first Pakistani to receive a Nobel Prize in science and the second from an Islamic country.

ISLAMABAD: Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif on Monday honoured Pakistan’s only Nobel laureate scientist Dr Abdus Salam by renaming the Physics department of a leading university after him, risking a backlash from fundamentalists who consider the physicist a heretic.

“Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has been pleased to give in principle approval for the renaming of National Centre for Physics at Quaid-i-Azam University (Islamabad) as ‘Professor Abdus Salam Center for Physics'”, according to a statement.

It said Sharif has directed Ministry of Federal Education and Professional to put up formal summary for renaming of the center for approval of the President of Pakistan.

The PM has also been pleased to approve the grant of five (5) fellowships annually to Pakistani students for PhD in the field of Physics through Higher Education Commission in reputed international universities.

“The fellowship programme is named as Professor Abdus Salam Fellowship,” according to his office.

Sharif has taken this decision in recognition of the “great contributions of renowned Pakistani physicist Dr Mohammad Abdus Salam” who is a major figure in the 20th century theoretical physics.

Salam shared the 1979 Nobel Prize in Physics for his contribution in the field of physics and become the first Pakistani to receive a Nobel Prize in science and the second from an Islamic country.

“His remarkable achievement earned fame and prestige for the country which rightly deserves to be valued,” PMO said.

Unfortunately, the recognition came late as by the time Dr Salam was honoured by the Nobel committee, Ahmadis were declared non-Muslims as part of Islamisation in 1974.

In 1984, they were banned from calling themselves Muslim. They are banned from preaching and even from travelling to Saudi Arabia for pilgrimage. Their publications are prohibited. Ahmadi mosques have been shut down.

Ahmedis were prosecuted by the fundamentalists and contribution of eminent people like Dr Salam was ignored.

Sharif’s decision may pitch him against the extremists who are still active to regularly attack the Ahmadiyya people.

In May 2010, suicide bombers killed 80 people at two mosques during Friday prayers.

Read original post here: Pakistan: QAU Physics Center renamed after Ahmadiyya Nobel laureate Dr Abdus Salam

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

Ghana: Ahmadiyya national leader says vigilante groups can plunge the country into chaos

Ghana: Ahmadiyya national leader says vigilante groups can plunge the country into chaos

Islam teaches peace, humility and decency and it was important that the youth acted with decorum, especially in expressing their support for their respective political parties.

Alhaji Maulvi Mohammed Bin Salih, leader of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission in Ghana, has added his voice to calls for the disbandment of vigilante groups, ahead of the 2016 polls, warning that they can plunge the country into chaos.

He said “Foot soldiers, who transform into vigilante groups like Azoka Boys, Bamba Boys, Bull Dogs, Invincible Forces cannot be allowed to operate because they have the potential to take up arms if they feel dissatisfied with election results and plunge this nation into civil war”.

Alhaji Salih, who was speaking at a forum on the role of the Muslim Community in ensuring peaceful elections, wondered why leaders of political parties entertained such groups if they meant well for Ghanaians.

He said “What is the justification for the existence of such groupings whose main business is to put fear and panic in the public, so that they can carry out their objectives of stealing ballot papers and prevent others from voting and immediately after elections go about vandalising public property”.

Alhaji Salih asked Muslim youth not to allow politicians to use them to perpetuate violence, saying, “the act of antagonising any member of society on the basis of religious or political differences is not Islamic”.

He said Islam teaches peace, humility and decency and it was important that the youth acted with decorum, especially in expressing their support for their respective political parties.

“Elections are a jaw-jaw affair, not war-war. If adherence to this principle of humility and decency is adopted by Muslims and Ghanaian electorate in general and applied to our current political activities, our motherland would be a better place for us all”.

He urged communicators of political parties to desist from trading of insults and provocative acts.

The President of the Islamic University College, Ghana (IUCG), Dr. Moshen Maarefi, said the value of peace transcends all religious organisations and was imperative that “all embrace and be committed to peace”.

He expressed hope that the president elect in the upcoming elections would embrace and respect the rights of Muslims, to enable them contribute to national development.

Alhaji Seidu Ali Pelpuo, the Vice President of Academic Affairs of the Madina Institute of Science and Technology, asked Ghanaians not to be swayed by the notion that the country could not experience war, adding that, a singular act of indiscretion could spark violence.

He urged Muslim youth to act wisely, reminding them that “followers of Allah’s message of peace cannot be the ones at the helm of unrest, disorder, mayhem and disturbance of peace and detractors from the rule of law through acts of lawlessness”.
Read original post here: Ghana: Ahmadiyya national leader says Vigilante groups can plunge the country into chaos

Nigeria: Ahmadiyya congratulates Sultan Of Sokoto on 10th anniversary on throne

Nigeria: Ahmadiyya congratulates Sultan Of Sokoto on 10th anniversary on throne

The Islamic organisation recalled the tremendous progress the Sultan of Sokoto has brought to unity among Muslims in Nigeria.

The Amir and entire members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamaat has congratulated the Sultan Of Sokoto, Alhaji Saad Abubabakar on his successful ten years reign for the good people of Sokoto state and Nigeria in general.

The Islamic organisation recalled the tremendous progress the Sultan of Sokoto has brought to unity among Muslims in Nigeria most especially the granting of approval for a parcel of land for the construction of Ahmadiyya mosque in Sokoto metropolis during his ten year reign.

The statement reads: “Ahmadiyya Muslim Community wishes the Sultan of Sokoto and the President Nigeria Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs many years of peaceful reign ahead.”

Read original post here: Ahmadiyya congratulates Sultan on 10th anniversary on throne

Australia: Ahmadiyya Muslims host open day at Baitul Huda mosque

Australia: Ahmadiyya Muslims host open day at Baitul Huda mosque

Ahmadiyya is a modern sect of Islam founded on the principle of ‘love for all, hatred for none’. It teaches that prophets of many religions all point to the same God.

The teacher became the student when Baitul Huda formally opened its doors to the public recently.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim mosque hosted an open day on Saturday, October 29, after being inspired by the Lebanese Muslim Association’s National Mosque Open Day.

The day proved the perfect opportunity for Kellyville High School student Naosheyrvaan Nasir to invite his teacher David Lamley to learn more about his religion.

“This to me looked like a golden opportunity […] and it turned out to be a success,” Naosheyrvaan said.

“I just realised he’s the kind of person who would be interested in the different faiths and cultures of different people, so I thought it might be good to bring him along and show him what I do.”

Naosheryvaan, 15, said in an age when information and disinformation is spread easily through the internet, face-to-face contact can be a better way to disprove some common misconceptions, including that women and non-believers are not allowed inside the mosque.

The teenager said he enjoys the opportunities he is afforded by being part of the Ahmadiyya youth.

“I’ve been part of activities such as Clean Up Australia Day, National Tree Plantation Day and Red Cross door knock appeal. I don’t think I would have had the courage to step up and go on my own if it wasn’t for the support the community has.

“It’s to me a sense of belonging and it’s just a really great feeling. It’s a really good social circle to be a part of.”

Ahmadiyya is a modern sect of Islam founded on the principle of ‘love for all, hatred for none’. It teaches that prophets of many religions all point to the same God.

Ahmaddiya Muslim Association Australia president Imam Kauser said the open day was an important opportunity to break down barriers between Muslims and non-Muslims.

“Islam is the most misunderstood religion these days,” he said. “They think that Muslims are only the terrorists. We wanted to let them know that Islam is nothing but peace.

“We are Australian, we are very loyal to the country, and we will do our best for the security of this country. We are very thankful to Australia.”

Imam Kauser said he enjoyed extending hospitality to invited guests and interested passers-by.

“Sharing is caring, of course. We wanted to let them know what we believe, what we practice and how many things are common in all religions.

“We should be talking about the commonalities rather than the differences.”

The Imam said the mosque is always open to the public but it was good to have a formal open day for those who have not visited before. He is hoping to make the day an annual tradition.

Read original post here: Australia: Ahmadiyya Muslims host open day at Baitul Huda mosque

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.