Use licensed weapons for self-defence: Sindh IG

Use licensed weapons for self-defence: Sindh IG

KARACHI: Sindh IG Allah Dino Khawaja urged on Wednesday the citizens to use licensed weapons for self-defence against criminals.

“The citizens can use their licensed weapons for self-defence. One will definitely resist and use their licensed weapon if robbers entered their home,” said Khawaja, while talking to the media at the Central Police Office (CPO). Khawaja was parsing efforts of a citizen, Y*, who had recently shot robbers in a Nazimabad neighbourhood.

Source/Credit: tribune

Gold falls on higher dollar

Gold falls on higher dollar

LONDON: The price of gold fell back on Wednesday, retreating from a three-week high hit in the previous session, after a rises in the dollar on the back of strong employment data.

Spot gold fell 0.6 percent to $1,355.61 an ounce by 1433 GMT. It hit $1,367.33, its highest since July 11, on Tuesday.

Spot palladium dipped 1.1 percent to $708.10 an ounce, after rising to $722.90 on Tuesday, the highest since June 2015.

Spot silver dropped 1.3 percent to $20.35 per ounce, a day after hitting a four-week high of $20.78.

Source/Credit: Dawn

USA: Ahmadiyya Muslims in Meriden among National Night Out events held across Connecticut

USA: Ahmadiyya Muslims in Meriden among National Night Out events held across Connecticut

HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) – An event meant to bridge a gap between police and the communities they serve is being held Tuesday night.

It’s part of the National Night Out effort.

National Night Out has been around since 1984 and stretches from the U.S. to Canada and military bases around the globe.

Meriden was also one of the communities holding a National Night Out, at Hubbard Park.

It was the 12th year for the free event, where 60 civic organizations and nonprofits showed up to share their services as well.

Two groups also taking part in the event were the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and the Meriden Police Department, with both hoping to use events like this one to build stronger relationships within the community.

“We are all about community service and helping our neighbors and getting to know everybody, especially after the incident that happened at our mosque…it’s very imperative to do this as Muslims we want to come and show our solidarity with everybody,” said Zahir Muhammed Mannan, of Ahmadiyya Muslim community.

“We want to build those relationships, to make sure that they can come to us and speak to us freely without having any repercussions whatsoever, we want an open relationship with the community and these are the types of event that help us build those bonds,” said Meriden Police Sgt. John Mennone.

Source/Credit: WFSB News

Canada: #MobileMuslims in the Sault

Canada: #MobileMuslims in the Sault

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama`at Canada has launched a nationwide campaign called #MobileMuslims, in which a mobile exhibition will be driven coast-to-coast to spread the true, peaceful teachings of Islam and remove misconceptions about the religion by stopping at various cities along the way.

In a world where unjust extremism is rampant, it is essential for Muslims to speak out and take the message of “Love for All, Hatred for None” across the country. Through this mobile-exhibition we wish to celebrate all the freedoms and opportunities we enjoy as Canadian Muslims. The mobile exhibition will depart St. John’s, Newfoundland and travel across Canada to finish its journey in Vancouver, British Columbia.

The journey is expected to last about 40 days and an exhibition will be set up in more than 25 Canadian towns and cities.

“This is our way of showing gratitude to our great country,” said Mr. Lal Khan Malik, National President of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama`at Canada. “Through this campaign, we aim to bridge gaps and remove misconceptions by taking the true, peaceful message of Islam from coast-to-coast.”

The Campaign started its journey on July 13th, 2016 in St. John’s NL and will make its way to Sault Ste. Marie, ON on Tuesday August 2nd, 2016, and will continue its journey towards Thunder Bay on August 3rd, 2016.

July 13: St. John’s, NL
July 14: Gander, NL
July 15: Corner Brook, NL
July 17: Sydney, NS
July 18: Halifax, NS
July 19: Halifax, NS
July 20: Charlottetown, PEI
July 21: Saint John, NB
July 22: Fredericton, NB
July 23: Quebec City, QC
July 24: Montreal, QC
July 25: Montreal, QC
July 26: Ottawa, ON
July 27: Ottawa, ON
July 28: Cornwall, ON
July 29: Perth, ON
July 30: Kingston, ON
July 31: Toronto, ON
Aug 1: North Bay, ON
Aug 1: Sudbury, ON
Aug 2: Sault Ste. Marie, ON
Aug 3: Thunder Bay, ON
Aug 4: Thunder Bay, ON
Aug 5: Kenora, ON
Aug 6: Winnipeg, MB

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is a dynamic and fast-growing international revival movement within Islam. Founded in 1889, the Community spans over 200 countries with membership exceeding tens of millions. The Community is the only Islamic organization to believe that the long-awaited Messiah has come, in the person of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (1835-1908) of Qadian, India, its founder. Ahmad claimed that God had sent him, like Jesus, to end religious wars, condemn bloodshed, reinstitute morality, justice & peace, and, most importantly, to teach mankind how to re-establish a personal relationship with God.

Source/Credit: Sault Online

UK: Human rights activist calls for Islamic state of mind to counter ‘ugliness that knows no border’

UK: Human rights activist calls for Islamic state of mind to counter ‘ugliness that knows no border’

Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association spokesman calls for an Islamic state of mind, not territory, to address ‘crisis of leadership and spirituality’ in the Muslim world.

Farooq Aftad, a lawyer and human rights activist from south London, has addressed what he describes as the ‘void’ between Islamic teachings and its violent and destructive application by groups like Daesh.

He is also the deputy director of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association, a group who have raised millions for charity, including Barnardo’s, the Royal British Legion Poppy Appeal, and were recognised in parliament last year when Prime Minister David Cameron described their work as ‘true faith in action’.

Following the recent terror attacks that have shaken Europe and the Middle East he said: “Striking terror into the hearts of ordinary people through violence and the projection of fear is an ugliness that knows no border and is common to people of all faiths and no faith at all.

“Terrorism perpetrated by extremists who identify themselves as Muslims has become an ever-present threat to the Muslim world and to the West.

“I find strength in the fact that while dozens of misguided people will be making their way to Syria in August, myself and 30,000 other Muslims from 100 countries, will be travelling to the UK to listen to the caliph of peace.”

The married father-of-four argues that the crisis of leadership allows room for hate preachers on our street corners and that the victims of this crisis are not just minorities and women but the whole Muslim world.

As a legal advisor to the international NGO, Human Rights Committee, he regularly liaises with government bodies on human rights and persecution issues with a particular focus on the persecution of Ahmadi Muslims.

His letter is reproduced in full below:

Striking terror into the hearts of ordinary people through violence and the projection of fear is an ugliness that knows no border and is common to people of all faiths and no faith at all.

Nevertheless, terrorism perpetrated by extremists who identify themselves as Muslims has become an ever-present threat to the Muslim world and to the West.

To tackle this expression of terrorism, the Muslim world must overcome its crisis of leadership and spirituality by building a strong Islamic state of mind and not fickle territorial boundaries.

In its earliest and most basic form, Islamic Sufism referred simply, yet profoundly, to the spiritual path towards God.

It represented a direct expression of the very soul and spirit of the religion.

While Muslims believe that this essence was omnipresent in the generations of the Prophet Muhammad, his Companions, and the two generations that followed, there is also an acceptance that, with time, it faded as proximity to the Prophet widened.

In the eleventh century, quoting an earlier saint of Islam, this reality led the Muslim saint Ali al-Hujwiri to write:

“’Today Sufism is a name without a reality, but formerly it was a reality without a name’ i.e. in the time of the Companions [of the Prophet Muhammad] and the Ancients, may God have mercy on them, this name did not exist, but the reality thereof was in everyone; now the name exists, but not the reality. That is to say, formerly the practice was known and the pretence unknown, but nowadays the pretence is known and the practice unknown.”

These words were both true to earlier prophetic statements attributed to the Prophet Muhammad and to the subsequent experience of Muslim territories and their people.

Over the centuries Muslims changed the world in very positive and profound ways through science, mathematics, engineering, art, literature and through their great spiritual contributions.

However it is also true that the administration of the religion of Islam became heavily formalised and largely reflective of the political ambitions of various, often despotic, monarchical dynasties and their ruling elites.

Today, however, the Muslim world faces an even greater crisis-one both of spirituality and religious leadership.

While medieval Islam was lavished with sophisticated legal and theological minds, today such expertise is extremely rare to find.

Even then, the custodians of Islam in the contemporary world are often duplicitous in their application of Islam and their actions.

The victims of this crisis are not just minorities and women but the whole Muslim world, shackled by a formality and literalism that has forgotten its medieval reality let alone that of the Prophet Muhammad.

There are exceptions to this but they are becoming few and far between. These voids in the Muslim world create the recruiting ground for groups like Daesh and for hate preachers on our street corners.

Confronted by this dangerous crisis of leadership, what is the majority of the Muslim community to do if it cannot rely on its leadership?

As an Ahmadi Muslim, led by a worldwide Caliph living in London, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, my experience has helped me to fill the gaps that some other young Muslims in the world have sadly fallen into and can perhaps add value to this discussion.

Unlike Al-Baghdadi, my Caliph has made it clear that, like the Prophet Muhammad, our ambition as Muslims is not at all related to territorial expansion or to force others to accept the world as I/we see it.

Rather, for my caliph: “Islam enshrines the principles of universal religious freedom and freedom of conscience. Faith is, and always will be, a matter of the heart and so there should never be any form of compulsion in religion.

“At a time of worldwide conflict, we should remember the basic principle that it is better for all forms of evil and cruelty to be suppressed and for all forms of goodness and humanity to be endorsed. In this way, evil will not spread far, whilst virtue and peace will spread far and wide and adorn our society.”

From 12-14 August, I will be going listen to a real worldwide caliph just outside of London, my Caliph, a man of compassion and peace.

And so, at a time of great uncertainty, when the Muslim world faces a crisis of leadership and spirituality, I find strength in the fact that while dozens of misguided people will be making their way to Syria in August, myself and 30,000 other Muslims from 100 countries, more people and nationalities than found in the entire membership of Daesh, will be travelling to the UK to listen to the caliph of peace, all of us in search of an Islamic state of mind.

Source/Credit: South West Londoner