USA: ‘Meet a Muslim Day’ in Seattle a chance to display true face of Islam, young men say

Ahmad Bilal, Faiez Ahmad and Luqman Munir couldn’t have been better positioned to talk about being Muslims than the cultural crossroads of Fourth Avenue and Pine Street in downtown Seattle on Saturday.

The trio, all members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association, took part in the organization’s “Meet a Muslim Day,” an effort in cities around the country to dispel myths about Islam and put a human face on a population that’s been the subject of stereotypes, public suspicion and in extreme cases, threats and violence.

For three hours on a showery Saturday, the men stood among the throngs of tourists and St. Patrick’s Day parade spectators at a corner of Fourth and Pine with a sign that read, “I am a Muslim: Ask me anything.”

Young Muslims with similar signs fielded questions at Seattle’s Green Lake, University District and Pike Place Market, too.

At Westlake, 30 or 40 people stopped by to speak with Bilal, Ahmad and Munir, including people who’d come for the parade, making for a vivid, impromptu cultural exchange.

The men showed off mobile-phone pictures of them posing with smiling, green-clad parade revelers.

They said they even had a productive discussion about Islam and Christianity with a man standing a few feet away holding a sign imploring onlookers to “repent and believe the gospel” of Jesus Christ.

“He gave us some knowledge and we gave him some knowledge,” said Bilal, a 20-year-old student at South Seattle College.

They invited the man to visit their mosque. He agreed to come, Bilal said.

While concerns about Islamophobia and the need for greater Muslim outreach have run high since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the controversy over President Donald Trump’s original and recently revised restrictions on certain Muslim immigrants and refugees gave those issues new urgency.

Violence and threats with religious overtones have become a pressing issue for other faiths, too. A spike in threats and incidents involving Jewish community centers, synagogues and cemeteries has put the nation’s Jewish community on edge.

In Kent, police are searching for a suspect who shot a Sikh man in what’s being investigated as a possible bias or hate crime, and in Kansas, two Indian computer engineers were shot by a gunman who yelled “get out of my country.” One of the victims in that shooting died.

Recent studies by the Pew Research Center show that most Americans don’t personally know a Muslim and that Americans are generally “cooler” toward Islam than other religious faiths. But getting to know someone who is Muslim leads to warmer feelings and more positive attitudes, their research suggests.

For Bilal, Ahmad and Munir, participating in Saturday’s event served as an opportunity to show that true Islam is about people like them, not the violent extremists who tend to capture headlines.

“I’m here to say that our religion is for peace; Islam is for peace,” Bilal said.

The men’s bold act comes on the heels of a visit to that very intersection in February by U.S. Marine and Muslim-American Mansoor Shams, who traveled the country with his own “Ask me anything” sign to encourage conversation about Islam with non-Muslims.

Bilal, who is Pakistani, said he lives with a host family in Seattle that once harbored negative attitudes about Islam, but having contact with him has changed their views.

The men know they won’t be able to end Islamophobia by themselves, but Munir is optimistic that events like Meet a Muslim Day will make a difference.

“Time heals,” he said. “We’ve just got to stick with our message.”

The men’s provocative sign asked passers-by to “ask me anything,” which might have led to some pretty awkward conversations. But most people simply expressed support rather than take them up on that offer.

“One lady asked me, ‘Do you want a hug?’” said Munir, a 25-year-old recent engineering grad. He said yes and the woman gave him a warm embrace.

Earlier, as Bilal walked to Westlake, a different woman who noticed the sign called out “I love you,” so Bilal shouted “I love you back.”

“Most people don’t care about religion,” Bilal said, recalling the encounter. “They care about peace.”

USA: Ahmadiyya Muslim group builds understanding over coffee in Austin, Round Rock

Seated in a booth at a Round Rock cafe on a recent Wednesday, Susan Sneller asked the question she’d always wondered about the headscarf, or hijab, that some women wear.

“Don’t you get hot in the summer wearing something on your head all day?” Sneller, who had never met anyone of the Muslim faith, asked Nadia Ahmad. “I want to take everything off and fan myself in summer in Texas.”

But Ahmad welcomed the question. In the summer, Ahmad explained, she wears clothing made of lighter weight material with good ventilation. “Don’t worry; we’re fine. We’re not forcing ourselves,” she said with a laugh.

It’s exactly this kind of learning and relationship-building that Ahmad and other members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community of Austin had in mind when the group began holding “Coffee, Cake and True Islam” events on Wednesdays at coffee shops in Austin and Round Rock. The events, which have been featured by KUT and other media outlets, and others like them are being held by chapters throughout the country.

Their message? “We are here to stay and we are your neighbors; come talk to us,” Ahmad said.

Arif Mirza is director of outreach for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community of Austin, which has a mosque in Round Rock and draws members from as far away as San Antonio. He points to a recent statistic: Just 38 percent of Americans say they know someone who is Muslim, according to a 2014 Pew Research Center survey. And even if they do, he said, they might not feel comfortable sharing their curiosities with that person.

“The idea is to give Americans who otherwise do not know a Muslim a chance to come in and ask any questions they might have about Islam,” Mirza said. “We’re hoping that in the long term we can bring about a change in attitude that is going to last.”

The same Pew survey showed that 41 percent of Americans view Muslims more coldly than warmly. And hate crimes against Muslims are on the rise. Last year, the number of physical assaults against Muslims in the United States reached 9/11-era levels, according to hate crimes statistics from the FBI.

At first, Mirza said, he worried about the potential backlash of putting on such an event, but he turned out to be “pleasantly surprised” by its positive reception.

Mirza recalled that once, a woman who was offended by the event accidentally called him to complain, thinking she was contacting the owner of the coffee shop. Once he told her who he was, however, the two ended up talking for 20 minutes, and the woman changed her tune, saying she’d like to meet him for coffee some time.

“Having that one-on-one conversation with somebody and getting to know that they have similar struggles in life and they probably feel the same way about things that you do, it has a way of affecting people that watching something on TV or somebody giving a lecture just doesn’t,” Mirza said.

In one of Wednesday’s small group conversations, Deborah Harris asked Touba Khurshid and Aziza Faruqi why they wanted to participate in the event. Khurshid, who had spent years living in London, told a story about going to South Dakota for the first time and noticing that people were staring at her.

“I remember all the looks that I was getting, and that was the first time I was like ‘Oh my gosh.’ I had never thought that I would get such curious looks as if they hadn’t seen a woman with a scarf,” Khurshid said. “It kind of made me realize there’s a big need for people to know about Islam.”

Contrary to that experience, Faruqi said she has never felt out of place during her 25 years in the U.S. because embracing differences is what America is about.

“That’s the America that we live in. That’s what we cherish,” Faruqi said. “So what disturbs us is the fact that living in such a multicultural, multireligion country, how can people still have fear of one faith or unwillingness to learn about other faiths?”

Faruqi said she wished more people outside of these events would feel free to ask her questions about Islam.

At the events, Mirza said questions range from personal (“How did you learn about Islam?”) to theological (“What does Islam say about God?”) to political (“How do you feel about President Donald Trump’s travel ban?”).

Politics and the new administration are what drew Sneller and Austin couple Jack and Barbara Bresette-Mills to recent coffee shop events. All are part of Indivisible, a national anti-Trump network with Austin origins.

“Because of this election, we both feel we have to stand up for people of color and minorities,” Jack Bresette-Mills said. “It seems to be a racist move in our government.”

“A lot of people have been cut down, and horrible things were said the whole campaign about all different kinds of people, be it women, be it Muslims, be it African-Americans, be it indigenous,” Barbara Bresette-Mills said.

“It’s simply wrong. It’s not American. (To be) American (means) everybody’s welcome,” Jack Bresette-Mills said.

On a basic level, he said, just as the members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community came to show them that not all Muslims are terrorists, he and his wife came to show them that not all non-Muslims are Islamophobic.

“We also just like to meet people,” Barbara Bresette-Mills said. “And I feel like that’s the best way to change things is to have human interaction. Talk to each other.”

At one point in the conversation with Ahmad and another woman, Maliah Ahmed, Sneller asked them what they would say if they could talk to Trump.

“We would invite him to ‘Coffee, Cake and True Islam,’” Ahmad said. The group laughed.

If you go

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community of Austin hosts “Coffee, Cake and True Islam” events from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesdays at two locations:

• Caffe Medici at 2222 Guadalupe St. in Austin

• Corner Bakery Cafe at 110 N. Interstate 35 in Round Rock

Source :http://www.mystatesman.com/

USA: Ahmadi Muslim youth group among first to assist at Jewish cemetery after vandalism

“Members of the local Ahmadiyya Muslim Community have showed up to help us right the headstones. They are calling their youth to come join us.

Between 75 and 100 tombstones were overturned and damaged Saturday night at a Jewish cemetery in Philadelphia, police said Sunday.

While social media users responded with outrage, a group from Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association physically showed up to assist in in cemetary.

A local rabbi, Yosef Goldman went on Facebook to say community support was immediate, writing: “Members of the local Ahmadiyya Muslim Community have showed up to help us right the headstones. They are calling their youth to come join us. #sacredresistance”

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf tweeted: “The vandalism of Jewish headstones at a Phila. cemetery is a cowardly, disturbing act. We must find those responsible and hold accountable.”

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney issued a statement urging solidarity. “Hate is not permissible in Philadelphia,” he said. “I encourage Philadelphians to stand with our Jewish brothers and sisters and to show them that we are the City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection.”

The Anne Frank Center for the United States urged President Trump to take action, tweeting: “Jewish graves in Philadelphia now vandalized. Stop this incubator of #Antisemitism and other hate. WE BEG YOU @POTUS @realDonaldTrump”

UK: Muslim and Christian event in Rose Hill promotes peace and understanding

Dr Zahid Khan referred to the historic incident when a delegation of 60 Christians were welcomed to pray in the Prophet Muhammad’s mosque in Medina and emphasised the Holy Prophet’s display of tolerance.

MUSLIMS and Christians came together in Rose Hill to find out more about the respective religions and promote peace.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community invited the Cowley Team Ministry and their friends to the interfaith event entitled Peace – Need of the Time.

The two groups met at Rose Hill Community Centre in Carole’s Way, Oxford, on February 11, with guest speaker Revd Canon Dr Geoff Bayliss enthusing the audience with a message of peace.

He spoke about the healing of a broken world, when peace will rule and the coming of the Kingdom of Heaven to earth when people will leave in peace and harmony.

About 80 people listened to the talk, which was followed by a speech from Dr Zahid Khan from Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.

Dr Khan focussed his speech on building friendship despite differences and the importance of mutual respect and understanding.

He referred to the historic incident when a delegation of 60 Christians were welcomed to pray in the Prophet Muhammad’s mosque in Medina and emphasised the Holy Prophet’s display of tolerance.

Dr Khan underscored the need to exercise justice in order to establish peace.

A question and answer session at the end allowed members of the audience to quiz both speakers, who provided answers from the viewpoint of their respective faiths.

The event ended with silent prayer and then dinner.

Source http://www.oxfordmail.co.uk

USA: Albany Ahmadiyya Muslim community dialogue aims to combat stereotypes about Islam

USA: Albany Ahmadiyya Muslim community dialogue aims to combat stereotypes about Islam

“The faith has been hijacked by the extremists. And we want to take it back. And basically tell that the Islamic faith has nothing to do with terrorism or violence

AMSTERDAM — “The understanding of the Muslim faith is not so good in the eyes of Americans,” said Dr. Hafeez Rehman, President of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Albany Chapter.

For more than a month Muslim community leaders have been holding weekly discussions about their faith at Fresh Basil in Amsterdam.

People of different religions and ethnicities also come.

“I try to tell them that we are actually really peaceful and I tell them like what we do and that we go to the mosque on Sundays and we learned that it’s really not as bad as people think,” said Soha Mahmood.

“I do have an understanding that the Bible and the Quran have similar teachings of values that we share and that’s how I see Islam,” said Amsterdam resident Maria Roman.

Organizers belong to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, which is one of more than 70 sects of Islam.

Dr. Rehman says they are trying to combat stereotypes about Muslims.

“The faith has been hijacked by the extremists,” Dr. Rehman said. “And we want to take it back. And basically tell that the Islamic faith has nothing to do with terrorism or violence,” he said.

Dr. Rehman said the international organization has held similar campaigns since September 11th.

However, issues including extremism and political tensions inspired the “Coffee, Cake and True Islam discussions.

“After I met a couple of Muslims and a couple of…and you just see that they are normal people,” said Amsterdam resident Zuzana Duffy.

74 of the organization’s chapters nationwide are holding similar events.

Noah Ahmad Quick, who was raised as a Catholic and converted to Islam in 2005, is part of a delegation addressing of members of Congress on Capitol Hill Friday, including Rep. Paul Tonko (D-Amsterdam).

“Our goal is to build bridges not to divide people but to bring people together under one comment card,” Quick said. “And that’s to serve humanity,” he said.

Kellianne Kennedy of Glens Falls, who is catholic, said the talks have changed her perception of Islam.

“I’ve only seen the Muslims on TV which are portrayed as terrorists and evil people,” Kennedy said. “Totally a 180. They are the most peaceful calm people,” she said.

The group will launch the discussions in Glens Falls and Albany next week.

They plan to hold the talks at least through the spring.

Halesowen’s Ahmadiyya Muslim Community to host peace exhibition in Hagley to counter extremist rhetoric

The event will start with a presentation on the history of the UK’s Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, whose motto is “love for all, hatred for none”.

One of Britain’s oldest Muslim communities is to host a peace exhibition in Hagley as part of a new campaign to counter extremist rhetoric and drive home a message of peace.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community based in Halesowen is organising the exhibition which will take place at Hagley Community Centre, Worcester Road, on February 18 from 10am until noon.

The event, part of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community’s United Against Extremism campaign, follows a similar event held in Kinver last year.Halesowen Peace exhibition-2016-2

Mubashir Nadeem, president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim elders association, said: “As a Muslim community, we believe it is our duty to serve this country and to stop extremism, particularly in the name of Islam, which teaches us peace, loyalty, freedom, equality, respect and love for all.

“We stand united with all who oppose extremists because our strength stems from our unity.

“The campaign will send a clear message that IS has nothing to do with Islam and that extremism will never succeed.

“The campaign will also see the distribution of half a million leaflets across the UK, to highlight Islam’s rejection of extremism and its emphasis on peace.”

The event will start with a presentation on the history of the UK’s Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, whose motto is “love for all, hatred for none”.

Displays promoting peace with translated excerpts of Qu’ranic verses along with other literature can also be seen.

To find out more about the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community’s work for community cohesion visit http://www.UnitedAgainstExtremism.com and loveforallhatredfornone.org

 

Source http://www.stourbridgenews.co.uk

Trump Muslim ban: US court rejects appeal to reinstate travel restrictions

LOS ANGELES: A US federal appeals court early Sunday rejected a request by the Department of Justice to immediately reinstate President Donald Trump´s travel ban.

Trump´s administration had lodged the request with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals as part of an appeal against a lower court order temporarily suspending the travel ban on citizens from seven mainly Muslim countries.

For now, the travel ban suspension remains in place. Both the State and Homeland Security Departments said Saturday they were resuming normal practices concerning travelers from the affected countries.

Judge William Canby, Jr. in Phoenix and Judge Michelle Friedland in San Francisco did not give a reason for their denial in a two-paragraph ruling.

However, they told the states of Washington and Minnesota, which had filed the original suit against Trump´s travel ban, to provide documents detailing their opposition to the government´s appeal by 11:59 pm Sunday (0759 GMT Monday).

The Department of Justice was given a deadline of 3 pm Monday to supply more documents supporting its position.

Source //www.thenews.com.pk

inaugurates the Baitul Ehsan Mosque

Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Inaugurates New Mosque in Mitcham, London

Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Inaugurates New Mosque in Mitcham, London

The local Ahmadi Muslims must fulfil the rights of their neighbours and inform the local people about the true peaceful teachings of Islam so that any fears or misconceptions that they may hold about Islam are removed.

Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad inaugurates the Baitul Ehsan Mosque

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is pleased to announce that on 7 January 2017, the World Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, the Fifth Khalifa (Caliph), His Holiness, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad inaugurated the Baitul Ehsan Mosque in Mitcham, London.

Upon arrival, His Holiness officially inaugurated the Mosque by unveiling a commemorative plaque and offering a silent prayer in thanks to God Almighty.

His Holiness then delivered an address to the local Ahmadi Muslims gathered at the event.

 Baitul Ehsan Mosque UK

Baitul Ehsan Mosque

Speaking about the true purpose of a Mosque, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad said:

“The purpose of a Mosque is to worship the One God, and so all those who come to worship in this Mosque should seek to fulfil this objective. Thus, Ahmadi Muslims should always pay full attention towards worship and fulfilling the obligations owed to God Almighty.”

His Holiness continued:

“As a result of building this Mosque, the local community will become more aware of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. Hence, the local Ahmadi Muslims must fulfil the rights of their neighbours and inform the local people about the true peaceful teachings of Islam so that any fears or misconceptions that they may hold about Islam are removed. May Allah enable you all to do this.”

After his address, His Holiness led the Zuhr and Asr prayers at the Mosque and inspected various facilities of the Mosque.

In addition to the prayer halls, the five-story building holds conference rooms, offices and various other facilities

Source:. http://timesofahmad.blogspot.com/2017/01/uk-head-of-ahmadiyya-muslim-community.html

Canada: New Ahmadiyya Mosque opened in Regina by Head of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community

Canada: New Ahmadiyya Mosque opened in Regina by Head of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community

His Holiness remarked that Ahmadi Muslims in Canada were extremely fortunate as they lived in a country where they could build Mosques and freely practice their faith, whereas Ahmadi Muslims living in Pakistan were unable to do so. 

Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad inaugurates the Mahmood Mosque and delivers the Friday Sermon during his tour of Canada

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is pleased to announce that on 4 November 2016, the World Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, the Fifth Khalifa (Caliph), His Holiness, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad inaugurated the Mahmood Mosque in Regina, which serves as the capital city of Saskatchewan Province in Canada.

Upon arrival, His Holiness officially inaugurated the Mosque by unveiling a commemorative plaque and offering a silent prayer in thanks to God Almighty.

His Holiness then delivered the weekly Friday Sermon from the newly built Mosque in which he outlined the true and entirely peaceful objectives of Mosques.

Furthermore, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad praised the efforts and sacrifices of the local Ahmadi Muslims who raised funds for the construction of the Mosque and even played a great role in its physical construction. His Holiness mentioned that the money spent on constructing the Mosque was greatly reduced due to the sacrifices made by the local Ahmadi Muslims who volunteered their time to help construct the Mosque. A total of 41,500 man-hours were dedicated by the local Ahmadi Muslims in building the Mosque.

Contrasting the peaceful actions of Ahmadi Muslims with the actions of extremist Muslims, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad said:

“Whilst certain Muslims are busy in spreading disorder in the world, Ahmadi Muslims are dedicating their time and wealth for building Houses of God. Ahmadi Muslims are acting in accordance to saying of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) who said that whosoever builds a House of Allah in this life, builds a house for himself in heaven.”

Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad continued and said that the sacrifices made by Ahmadi Muslims were in order to attain the pleasure of Allah and to dispel misunderstandings about Islam.

Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad said:

“The sacrifices by Ahmadi Muslims are for the sake of informing the world that Mosques and the teachings of Islam are not the cause of disorder in the world, rather they are a means of bettering ourselves in this life and in the Hereafter. They draw mankind towards loving their Creator and His Creation.”

His Holiness remarked that Ahmadi Muslims in Canada were extremely fortunate as they lived in a country where they could build Mosques and freely practice their faith, whereas Ahmadi Muslims living in Pakistan were unable to do so.

Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad said:

“Often Ahmadi Muslims in Pakistan write to me in great distress asking for prayers that the laws change so that they can build Mosques or even halls where they can offer their prayers in congregation. Currently, they are not even permitted to build a room with an extended place for the Imam to stand in and so Mosque features such as minarets and domes are out of the question. In fact in some areas the conditions are so harsh that Ahmadi Muslims cannot even construct buildings that face towards Mecca.”

His Holiness said that at a time where materialism was increasingly dominant, it was the duty of Ahmadi Muslims to inform others about the blessings of spirituality and religion.

Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad said:

“At this moment in time, the majority of the world considers material progress as its sole objective… In such times, it is the responsibility of Ahmadi Muslims to inform the world that the pursuit of materialism cannot bring eternal joy or contentment. Rather, the true and everlasting means to happiness and peace is attained by fulfilling the rights of God.”

His Holiness said that the Mosque was bound to spark interest amongst the local population and that the local people would take note of the conduct of those who attended the Mosque. Therefore, it was incumbent upon Ahmadi Muslims to exhibit excellent moral conduct and righteousness at all times.

Concluding the Friday Sermon, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad prayed:

“May Allah the Almighty enable our children to understand that the sacrifices made by their parents, the Mosques that they built, promoting the true teachings of Islam and the moral and spiritual guidance they gave to their children is in actuality the real wealth their parents left behind for them. May Allah enable the future generations to also inculcate this conviction within their children too.”

– Canada: New Mosque opened by Head of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Regina

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

India: 37th Annual Convention of Ahmadiyya Muslim elders concludes in Qadian

India: 37th Annual Convention of Ahmadiyya Muslim elders concludes in Qadian

Maulana Mohammad Inam Ghori awarded Ialm-e Ina’ami to Majlis Ansarullah Qadian which stood first among Indian chapters for their excellent work for their organization and membership.

Qadian: The 3-day 37th National Ijtema of the Ahamadiyya Muslim Elders Association, Majlis Ansarullah Bharat, concluded here in Qadian.

The concluding session, presided over by Chief Secretary of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at Bharat, Maulana Mohammad Inam Ghori, was held at the T.I. Senior Secondary School Grounds near Sarae Tahir.

National President Majlis Ansarullah Bharat, Zainuddin Hamid were also present on the stage.

After the Recitation of the Holy Quran, and pledge for Loyalty with Islam-Ahmadiyyat and Caliphate, Zainuddin Hamid  thanked the Ijtema participants and volunteers for making the Ijtema successful and appreciated the local administration for their co-operation.

Maulana Mohammad Inam Ghori addressed the Ijteman participants also, advising the member to always follow the directives of the Khalifa of Islam.

Maulana Mohammad Inam Ghori awarded Ialm-e Ina’ami to Majlis Ansarullah Qadian which stood first among Indian chapters for their excellent work for their organization and membership.

Maulana Mazhar Ahmad Waseem received the trophy and Majlis Flag with his team from Maulana Mohammad Inam Ghori.

Prizes were distributed also to the players and other elders who took any of the topt three positions in the various competitions held by Majlis Ansarullah Bharat.

The session was concluded with silent prayers.

_________________________________
Ch.Maqbool Ahmad Journalist Qadian
ahmadmaqbool@hotmail.com

Read original post here: India: 37th Annual Convention of Ahmadiyya Muslim elders concludes in Qadian

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.