Trump Muslim ban: US court rejects appeal to reinstate travel restrictions

LOS ANGELES: A US federal appeals court early Sunday rejected a request by the Department of Justice to immediately reinstate President Donald Trump´s travel ban.

Trump´s administration had lodged the request with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals as part of an appeal against a lower court order temporarily suspending the travel ban on citizens from seven mainly Muslim countries.

For now, the travel ban suspension remains in place. Both the State and Homeland Security Departments said Saturday they were resuming normal practices concerning travelers from the affected countries.

Judge William Canby, Jr. in Phoenix and Judge Michelle Friedland in San Francisco did not give a reason for their denial in a two-paragraph ruling.

However, they told the states of Washington and Minnesota, which had filed the original suit against Trump´s travel ban, to provide documents detailing their opposition to the government´s appeal by 11:59 pm Sunday (0759 GMT Monday).

The Department of Justice was given a deadline of 3 pm Monday to supply more documents supporting its position.

Source //www.thenews.com.pk

The ban will not affect Canadians, until it did | Naila Chaudhry

My mind cannot stop wondering: what if that happened to me? What if that was my brother? My family? This just happened in my home. Not down south, but in my home, in Canada.

At least six dead in Quebec City, as a mosque was attacked shortly after evening prayers. This also happens just days after United States President Donald Trump bans refugees, migrants and foreign nationals from seven predominantly Muslim countries. As I flipped through every news channel, I heard this ban would not affect Canadians — but it just did. My fellow Muslim brothers have just been murdered in Canada because of their faith.

You see, Trump’s policies are a global issue. They may not be a threat directly, but when policies are based off of hate, it normalizes a hateful rhetoric. It normalizes animosity. That ideology then transcends borders and, ultimately, innocent people pay the price.

My mind cannot stop wondering: what if that happened to me? What if that was my brother? My family? This just happened in my home. Not down south, but in my home, in Canada.

Here in Saskatoon, my community is anxiously awaiting the next few weeks to pass, as the first ever purpose-built mosque in Saskatoon is almost finished. The construction is coming to an end after the 14 years I have lived in Saskatoon waiting for its completion. However, in these 14 years, I have never once fathomed that here in Canada our mosques could be a target of such violence. I could never imagine community members being killed while praying.

A mosque is a house of God. Its purpose is to emulate peace. It is a place for all people to come worship. Muslims are peaceful people. In times like this, my community and I open our doors for dialogue. Fear has been ignited amongst people, but hatred and violence is not the answer. It is never the answer.

The Fourth Caliph of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, Mirza Tahir Ahmad, once said “swords can win territories, but not hearts. Force can bend heads, but not minds.”

Let us win hearts and bend minds with compassion, with love. Mosques around your community are open to all people. Let us not fear one another. Let us come together and unite under humanity. Let us not divide. Let us stand in alliance against hate. Let us talk.

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Naila Chaudhry is a member of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamat in Saskatoon.

Read original post here: Perspective: The ban will not affect Canadians, until it did | Naila Chaudhry

New Zealand: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community condemns Trump’s Refugee Ban

 Ahmadiyya Muslim Community condemns Trump’s Refugee Ban

“We are deeply troubled by the policies being announced by the new US administration. At a time when many of the world’s nations are ravaged by war, famine, and religious intolerance, the last thing we needed was more divisive measures”

We stand together with anyone who faces persecution in any form.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community strongly condemns the ban announced by US President Donald Trump on travel of residents of the seven Muslim countries, as well as the strict restrictions place on refugee movement into and through the US. The community strongly believes that such restrictions are a violation of the basic human rights, and affect in some cases the most vulnerable of people who are seeking refuge from injustice, violence, and persecution.

“We are deeply troubled by the policies being announced by the new US administration. At a time when many of the world’s nations are ravaged by war, famine, and religious intolerance, the last thing we needed was more divisive measures” says Mr Bashir Khan, the President of AMJNZ.

“The powerful western nations are looked upon as the leaders of the free world, providing guidance and leadership to the weak and oppressed. If at a time like this, they start talking of barriers and walls, then what hope is there for the rest of us? We stand together with anyone who faces persecution in any form. And while we recognize and appreciate the need to stop terrorist movements, such measures can only be counter productive and serve as propaganda tools in the hands of religious fanatics” said Mr. Khan.

The community leader urges the New Zealand government to take a stand against such measures, condemning these as a violation of human rights.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is a dynamic, fast-growing international revival movement within Islam. Founded in 1889 by Hadhrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (1835-1908) in Punjab, India, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community spans over 206 countries with

membership exceeding tens of millions. Its motto of ‘Love for all and hatred for none’ is evidenced through the peaceful actions of its millions of followers. The New Zealand branch of this community was established in 1987 and has now expanded to over 500 members. It is a registered charitable organisation and endeavors to be an active and integrated community within New Zealand society.

Historic Indian mosque agrees to lift ban on women

Historic Indian mosque agrees to lift ban on women

NEW DELHI: 

An historic mosque in India agreed Monday to scrap a ban on women entering its inner sanctum, after a bitter legal battle about the restriction in the deeply religious country.

The Haji Ali Dargah trust has barred women from the landmark mausoleum off the coast of Mumbai since 2011, insisting the presence of women near the tomb of a revered saint is a “grievous sin” in Islam.

The trustees had appealed to the Supreme Court against a lower court’s decision in August to overturn the ban as a violation of constitutional rights of equality.

But the trust told the Supreme Court on Monday it would now admit women but needed several weeks to set up special entry areas to the tomb in the 15th-century building.

300-year-old mosque to be rebuilt on Hindu temple land

“The trust has decided to give women access to the sanctorum housing the saint’s tomb,” its lawyer Gopal Subramanium told the court.

A Muslim women’s rights group hailed the decision as a victory which would likely put pressure on other places of worship that have gender restrictions.

“It is restoring the Islamic values of what we have always believed as Muslims, that Islam is a religion of equality, democracy and women’s rights,” Noorjehan Niaz, co-founder of Bharatiya Muslim Mahila Andolan which campaigns for the rights of Muslim women in India, told AFP.

Niaz was one of the petitioners who filed the case against the Haji Ali Dargah trust on constitutional grounds.

Women in India have been intensifying their campaigns to be allowed to enter a string of Hindu temples and other religious sites.

Lawyers of Indian state back Muslim women’s demand to use Mumbai mosque

Hundreds of women staged a protest march to a temple in Maharashtra state in January, leading the high court in Mumbai to strike down a ban against women entering a shrine there.

The reasons for the trust’s change of heart in the latest case were unclear. But the Supreme Court when taking up the appeal had expressed hopes of a “progressive” approach from it, according to the Press Trust of India.

Haji Ali Dargah is one of Mumbai’s most recognisable landmarks and receives tens of thousands of not only Muslims but Hindu devotees and sightseeing tourists every week.

The mosque is located on an islet accessible via a causeway at low tide. It was built in memory of a wealthy Muslim who gave up his worldly possessions and went on a pilgrimage to Mecca.

source The Express Tribune news

Burkini ban evokes a deadly past

Burkini ban evokes a deadly past 

Recently, pictures of French police ordering the removal of a burkini worn by a woman at a beach have gone viral on media. In a separate incident, a mosque construction in a Georgia county is facing strong opposition from locals.

To add insight, the caliph of Islam Mirza Masroor Ahmad (fifth supreme head of the Worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community) has advised Western powers to choke off funding channels to ISIS to stop them in their tracks and defeat them once and for all. If only the intentions of world powers are pure and hellbent on stopping terrorism.

Banning burkinis and mosques is no solution, but an invitation for more division and religious apartheid. This in actuality is Déjà vu all over again, a reminder of a deadly past that Europeans suffered during World War II. But back then it was not the Muslims but rather Jews that suffered state-backed apartheid and persecution. We all know too well the consequences of that.

To conclude, it is sad to see the world is still divided and seeks to avenge the wrong people in this instance.

Nayyar Ahmed, Pittsburgh

iRabwah | News Watch |
Source/Credit: The Dallas Morning News