Kheer

Making kheer is now become easy.

People will be enjoying Eid tomorrow so we have made easy to cook their favorite dessert for them.
Here is the Kheer recipe read and make a delicious kheer for you and your family.
Kheer
Cook time
Total time
A Pakistani rice pudding, Kheer is infused with cardamom and slow cooked for a couple of hours. The end result is nothing short of magical!
Author: Rookie With A Cookie
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Pakistani
Serves: 4-5
Ingredients
  • 4½ cup whole milk
  • ¼ cup uncooked rice
  • 7 tbsp sugar
  • 4-5 cardamom pods
  • Crushed nuts to garnish (pistachio, cashews, blanched almonds)
Instructions
  1. First, we are going to OVER cook the rice in boiling water for 10-12 minutes, until they get really soft and mushy.
  2. Next, strain the rice and with the back of a fork, mash it well until it resembles oatmeal.
  3. Next, heat up the milk in a stainless steel deep saucepan and let it come to a gentle simmer.
  4. Open the cardamom pods and add it to the milk. (Once Kheer is done, you can simply take out the husk since we’re only using 5 pods.)
  5. Next, add the rice and sugar. The rice will be clumpy but as it cooks, it will break down.
  6. Now on very low heat, cook the Kheer for 3 hours. Make sure you stir every once in a while. The milk will inevitably catch at the bottom so make sure you use a stainless steel pot because if you use a non-stick saucepan, the brown bits will peel off as you stir and distribute throughout the Kheer. That would be gross!
  7. After 3 hours of slow cooking, the Kheer will have thickened. It should fall in little clumps from the spatula (see the video for clarity).
  8. Immediately pour in terracotta bowls and garnish with crushed nuts. The skin that forms on the surface is the BEST part!
  9. Let Kheer cool in serving the dish for 15-20 minutes before serving.
  10. You can keep this in the fridge covered for up to 3 days but who’s even saving for later.
Child finds 'sliced finger tip' in Japanese noodles

Child finds ‘sliced finger tip’ in Japanese noodles

Child finds ‘sliced finger tip’ in Japanese noodles

TOKYO: 

A child who was tucking into noodles at a popular Japanese restaurant found some extra topping in the bowl —  the tip of a sliced finger, a health official said Thursday.

A female customer complained to staff when her child made the gruesome finding at a “ramen” noodle outlet run by Kourakuen Holdings in the central Japanese city of Shizuoka last month.

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It turned out to be a piece of “nail with thick skin”, according to Masashi Goto, a local official in charge of inspecting food hygiene.

“We were able to understand it was part of a finger,” he told AFP on the phone, adding that the tip was about one centimetre (0.4 inch) wide and 7-8 millimetres long.

The shop’s operator has submitted a letter of apology to the health office and vowed to ensure that a similar incident does not happen again, he said.

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An official at Kourakuen Holdings, which operates a chain of “ramen” noodle restaurants in the country, said the incident occurred when a female kitchen worker accidentally cut her thumb while slicing a chunk of pork.

The company said it had apologised to the customer but added that what had slipped into the bowl was not a fingertip but only a “nail”.

Kourakuen operates more than 520 outlets in Japan.

Feeding babies egg and peanut may prevent food allergy, study suggests

Feeding babies egg and peanut may prevent food allergy, study suggests

Feeding babies egg and peanut may reduce their risk of developing an allergy to the foods, finds a new study.

In the research, which is the largest analysis of evidence on the effect of feeding allergenic foods to babies, scientists from Imperial College London analysed data from 146 studies. In total the studies involved more than 200,000 children.

The results suggest feeding children egg between the ages of four and six months may reduce their risk of developing egg allergy.

The study, which was commissioned by the UK Food Standards Agency, also found feeding children peanut, between the ages of four and eleven months, may reduce risk of developing peanut allergy.

In addition, the team analysed milk, fish (including shellfish), tree nuts (such as almonds) and wheat, but didn’t find enough evidence to show introducing these foods at a young age reduces allergy risk.

The research is published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Although previous studies have found feeding children peanut and egg may reduce allergy risk, other studies have found no effect.

Dr Robert Boyle, lead author of the research from the Department of Medicine at Imperial, said: “This new analysis pools all existing data, and suggests introducing egg and peanut at an early age may prevent the development of egg and peanut allergy, the two most common childhood food allergies.

“Until now we have not been advising parents to give these foods to young babies, and have even advised parents to delay giving allergenic foods such as egg, peanut, fish and wheat to their infant.”

Allergies to foods, such as nuts, egg, milk or wheat, affect around one in 20 children in the UK. They are caused by the immune system malfunctioning and over-reacting to these harmless foods. This triggers symptoms such as rashes, swelling, vomiting and wheezing.

“The number of children diagnosed with food allergies is thought to be on the rise,” added Dr Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, a co-author on the study from the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial. “There are indications that food allergies in children have become much more common over the last 30 years.

The number of patients coming into our clinics has increased year-on-year, and allergy clinics across the country have seen the same pattern.”

She added that the reasons behind this rise are still unclear — doctors may be better at recognising food allergy, or there may be environmental factors involved.

In the new study, called a meta-analysis, the team initially analysed 16,289 research papers on allergies and other immune system problems. Out of these, 146 were used for data analysis of when to feed babies allergenic foods such as egg, peanut, wheat and fish.

The results showed that children who started eating egg between the ages of four and six months had a 40 per cent reduced risk of egg allergy compared to children who tried egg later in life.

Children who ate peanut between the ages of four and eleven months had a 70 per cent reduced peanut allergy risk compared to children who ate the food at a later stage. However, the authors cautioned that these percentages are estimates based on a small number of studies.

Five studies (involving 1915 children) were used to estimate reduced risk of egg allergy, and two studies (involving 1550 children) were used to estimate reduced risk of peanut allergy. Therefore these figures may change when more studies are completed.

The team also calculated absolute risk reduction. They found that in a population where 5.4 per cent of people have egg allergy (the UK prevalence rate from one recent study), introducing egg between four and six months of age could prevent 24 cases of egg allergy per 1,000 people.

For peanut, in a population where 2.5 per cent of people have peanut allergy, introducing the food between four and eleven months could prevent 18 cases per 1,000 people.

The authors cautioned that the analysis didn’t assess safety, or how many of the babies suffered allergic reactions from the early introduction.

Dr Boyle cautioned against introducing egg and peanut to a baby who already has a food allergy, or has another allergic condition such as eczema. “If your child falls into these categories, talk to your GP before introducing these foods.” He also noted that whole nuts should not be given to babies or toddlers due to the choking hazard. “Whole nuts should be avoided in young children — if you decide to feed peanut to your baby, give it as smooth peanut butter.”

The team also analysed whether introducing peanut, egg, milk, fish or wheat early into a baby’s diet affected their risk of autoimmune diseases such as coeliac disease. The team found no effect on risk.

Commenting on the findings, the UK Food Standards Agency said: “Imperial College London has produced a high quality review. The Government is considering these important findings as part of its review of complementary feeding for infants to ensure its advice reflects the best available evidence.

Families should continue to follow the Government’s current long-standing advice to exclusively breastfeed for around the first six months of age because of the health benefits to mothers and babies. ”

The study was funded by the UK Food Standards Agency who commission research to understand the causes and mechanisms of food allergy and intolerance. The study was also supported by the Imperial NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, and the MRC-Asthma UK Centre in Allergic Mechanisms of Asthma.

sourchttps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160920112328.htme