Indian families stranded in Pakistan appeal for help.

Two families from India who were visiting Pakistan are now stranded in Pakistan due to the closure of the Attari-Wagah border amid coronavirus fears.

Mohammad Anwar, a resident of Qadian came to visit Pakistan along with his wife and daughter but got stranded in Chenab Nagar. Speaking to Punjab Gazette, he said:

“I traveled to Pakistan via Wagah border on March 12 with my wife and daughter to meet my in-laws, But we got stuck here due to the border closure”

Anwar is not alone, his cousin Rafiq Ahmed who is also a resident of Qadian has been stuck in Chenab Nagar with his Pakistani wife and daughter for the past month.

Both families have appealed to the Indian authorities for help, so they can return to their homes in India.

India-Pakistan border was closed on March 18th due to the coronavirus pandemic. According to reports, there are over 100 Indians, including Kashmiri students, currently stranded in Pakistan. On April 16th, 41 Pakistani nationals, were allowed to return to Pakistan via Wagah border. Similarly, another group of 169 Pakistanis crossed over from India into Pakistan on May 5th. Surprisingly no Indian national stranded in Pakistan has been allowed to return home so far.

Ahmadis excluded from Pakistan’s Minorities Commission.

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan on Tuesday backtracked on his decision to include Ahmadis in the National Commission for Minorities.

During a cabinet meeting with his top minister, PM Khan approved a memo submitted by the Ministry of Religious Affairs & Interfaith Harmony urging the cabinet to exclude Ahmadis due to the “religious and historical sensitivity of the issue.”

The same cabinet on April 29th had ordered the Ministry of Religious Affairs to include the Ahmadis, saying that:

“The Ahmadi community, being a minority in accordance with the constitution of Pakistan, should also be represented in the Commission.”

The decision to give representation to Ahmadis triggered a nationwide backlash against the government. To quell the backlash the Ministry proposed that the cabinet drop its prior decision to include Ahmadis, stating that:

“So far decision at 1(c) is concerned, Ministry proposes that representative of Ahmadi community must not be included in the NCM, given the religious and historical sensitivity of the issue”

The Ahmadis who claim to be Muslim were declared “non-Muslim” in 1974 and have since been severely persecuted for their religious beliefs.

Hamza Abbasi says he was wrong to call Ahmadis ‘non-Muslim’.

Former Pakistani actor Hamza Ali Abbasi said on Saturday that he was wrong in labeling Ahmadis as non-Muslims. He was backtracking from comments he made in 2016 declaring the minority Ahmadis a religion separate from Islam.

Abbasi said on Twitter: “I was wrong in calling them non-Muslim. I can only say that they are wrong in their belief.” The actor was responding to a barrage of abusive tweets that were part of a Pakistan wide Twitter trend against Ahmadis. ”

Abbasi added that: “If a group or person calls himself a Muslim……then no individual has the authority to declare them non-Muslim.”

The twitter trend was in reaction to the government’s decision to include the Ahmadis in the National Minority Commission, a step rejected by a majority of Pakistanis.

Pakistan to include Ahmadis in National Commission for Minorities.

Pakistan on Wednesday announced the inclusion of minority Ahmadis in the National Commission for Minorities.

According to 92 News, the federal cabinet on April 20 had approved plans by the Ministry of Religious Affairs to reorganize the commission. However, the proposal did not include a representative of the Ahmadi community.

Subsequently, several Ministers raised the issue with PM Khan and suggested that Ahmadis be included in the commission. Accepting the suggestion by the Ministers PM Imran Khan on Wednesday directed that the National Commission for Minorities be overhauled to include Ahmadis. PM Khan further directed that an updated memo be sent to the Ministry of Religious Affairs.

The commission will compromise of 7 official members and 8 non-official members.

Ramadan begins during strict restrictions and lockdowns.

The holy month of Ramadan has begun in many parts of the world on Friday amid a severe and unusual lockdown.
Lockdown continues in most Muslim countries around the world due to the spread of the coronavirus, and authorities have banned congregational prayers and gatherings.
According to the French news agency AFP, the easing of lockdowns in some countries with the arrival of Ramadan has raised concerns about the spread of the virus.

This year, the month of Ramadan did not bring the traditional twists and turns for many in Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. Because during Ramadan, there are restrictions on praying in congregation in mosques and meeting friends, and large-scale Iftar Parties.

In Dhaka, government officials have sealed off a centuries-old market that used to sell traditional Ramadan food.
The local police commissioner said this would be the first time in the market’s 400- year history that iftar items would not be sold here.
Sanctions imposed by Corona have also undermined the traditional cycle of Ramadan in Indonesia, the world’s most populous country. Religious organizations in Indonesia have called on people to stay indoors.
. “Ramadan is very different,” said Fitria Female, a housewife in Indonesia. “It’s not just a festival.”

Pakistan: Two people of propaganda ended at COVID, Ahmadi reaches the doctor’s grave: spokesman Jamaat Ahmadiya.

ISLAMABAD: Ahmadi Dr. Naqi-ud-Din, who was recently killed on duty in the Coronavirus, was buried in a graveyard dedicated to Ahmadis in Islamabad.
Ahmadiya party spokesman Salimuddin claimed on Twitter account that two people, who described themselves as members of the Prophecy Movement yesterday, arrived in Ahmadiya Cemetery in Islamabad and inquired about Dr. Naqiuddin’s grave.

On being asked, they were told that they had been sent by government officials and they came to inspect the grave of Dr. Naqi who was recently killed in Karuna and buried in the cemetery.

The spokesperson added that the cemetery administration immediately contacted the relevant SHO and they were told that no authority was allowed by any authority to visit the cemetery and such elements should not be allowed at all.

An attempt was made to speak to a spokesman for the prophetic end in this regard, but he could not get a response. Human rights organizations have condemned the incident, expressing concern.

It should be remembered that people belonging to the Ahmadi religion have been declared non-Muslims in Pakistan and since then they have faced religious extremism and hatred as a minority.