USA: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community CT observes Promised Reformer Day

The published and widely circulated prophecy which stated he would “heal through Messianic qualities and blessings of the Holy Spirit…as if Allah had descended from heaven” was fulfilled in the person of Hazrat Mirza Bashiruddin Mahmud Ahmad (1889-1965).

Baitul Aman “House of Peace” Mosque Meriden commemorates the fulfillment of a grand prophecy of Messiah Ahmad

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, America’s oldest and largest Islamic Organization unified behind one spiritual leader, is observing National Prayer Week 2017 from Monday, February 20th to Sunday, February 26th.

Inaugurating National Prayer Week was the refreshing observance of the historic Promised Reformer Day commemorating the manifestation of the Divine Revelation vouchsafed to the Promised Messiah, Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (1835-1908), foretelling the birth of a spiritually and secularly illustrious son within nine years of February 20th 1886.

The published and widely circulated prophecy which stated he would “heal through Messianic qualities and blessings of the Holy Spirit…as if Allah had descended from heaven” was fulfilled in the person of Hazrat Mirza Bashiruddin Mahmud Ahmad (1889-1965), the second Khalifah or Successor of the worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, who himself claimed it in 1944.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community CT celebrated this heavenly sign in support of true Islam, the Holy Quran and Holy Prophet Muhammad with education and prayers.

India: Masngalore Ahmadiyyas stage faith outreach effort to promote True Islam

Ahmadiyya, a reformist sect of Islam, was founded by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian in Punjab, India. Hazarat Ahmad, who claimed to be the promised reformer awaited by many religions in the latter days.

Ahmadiyya Muslim community’s Mangalore Chapter in Karnataka, India, organized a faith outreach event to propagate the peaceful message of Islam-Ahmadiyya in Udupi, a costal city, 65 kilometers from Mangalore, and in Manipal, a suburb within the city of Udupi.

On February 19, 2017, a team of ten volunteers, under the leadership of their local president, Muhammad Yusuf, were joined by vice president B.S. Abdurrahim; Ahmadiyya Imam, Molvi Asif Ahmad Khadim; and the youth leader, M. Abdus Salam from the Mangalore Mosque in the leafleting project. rabwah news1

The volunteers distributed more than 700 leaflets and pamphlets to the general public at the two locations.

madiyya, a reformist sect of Islam, was founded by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian in Punjab, India. Hazarat Ahmad, who claimed to be the promised reformer awaited by many religions in the latter days.

Ahmadiyya doctrine rejects violence in all forms and promotes a peaceful existence according to the laws of the land wherever people happen to live.

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With files form V. A. Rashied, Secretary Dawat-e-ilallah, Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamaat, Mangalore

— India: Ahmadiyyas in Mangalore stage faith outreach effort to promote True Islam

USA: CT Muslim community leaders meet with lawmakers ahead of prayer week

“All over the world, not just the United States, people are actually coming together even more, bowing our heads together to pray for this country because of the turmoil that we live in, that’s happening in this world today, we need a lot of prayers.”

MERIDEN, CT (WFSB) – Muslims across the country kicked off their National Prayer Week on Monday.

For some Muslims in Connecticut, the week comes on the heels of a trip to the nation’s capital to meet with lawmakers to talk about number of things, including President Donald Trump’s recent executive order banning citizens from seven primarily Muslim countries from entering the United States.

Leaders of the Ahmadiyya Baitul Aman “House of Peace” Mosque in Meriden said they hope the trip to Washington D.C., as well as this week of prayer, will help bring together a divided nation.

“The world is a global village, we need to bring unity and unite people together,” said Wajid Ahmed, of Ahmadiyya Baitul Aman.

That is the message Ahmed, along with more than 200 other delegates from mosques all across the country took with them to Washington D.C. last week.

“There were really three things that we wanted to focus on, we wanted to meet our legislatures and our leaders and educate them on true Islam and what the true teaching of what is Islam is about,” Ahmed said.

This is the seventh year the delegates have gone to D.C. but this year it was during a changing and volatile climate in the country.

The new president’s executive order, banning immigrants from seven primarily Muslim countries from entering the United States was also a concern.

“I feel that the way we rolled out the executive order, it was done in a way that kind of broke the bridges that we are trying to unite people together,” Ahmed said.

The trip led into the National Prayer week for Muslims.

“All over the world, not just the United States, people are actually coming together even more, bowing our heads together to pray for this country because of the turmoil that we live in, that’s happening in this world today, we need a lot of prayers,” Ahmed said.

He added that the ultimate goal is to educate people on what their faith is really about and who they are, as people.

“More than 60 percent of Americans have never met a Muslim or they think they’ve never met a Muslim because we might look a little different but in might look like anyone else,” Ahmed said.

They are also reaching out to other clergy in the state to join them for an interfaith prayer service.

That service will take place on Thursday at 7 p.m.

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