Apple teasing Black Friday sale for the first time in years

Apple teasing Black Friday sale for the first time in years

This Black Friday, Apple customers don’t need to purchase their favourite gadgets through third-party retailers as the company for the first time in years is offering a Black Friday sale.

Teased as a one-day sale event on November 25, prompting fans to “save the date”, a slogan that the tech giant previously used to market the iPhone 7 launch event.

Apple says AirPod shipments to be delayed

Apple has not revealed exact details of what to expect or which products are likely to be put on sale, however, the Apple Watch is prominently displayed on the page.

The teaser page currently says, “Come back this Friday to check everyone off your list.”

Moreover, shoppers who order in-stock items before 5pm will also be eligible for free two-day delivery, according to Apple.

No Black Friday deals were offered by the Apple last year, all it offered were iTunes gift cards with the purchase of certain items made on the shopping holiday. This year, however, we can expect a larger sale on Apple devices.

Apple now offers refurbished iPhones at a discount

Apple’s latest earnings results marked the third consecutive quarter in which year-over-year revenue has declined. Although, it sold more iPhones than expected in the previous quarter, the smartphones’ shipments fell by 5%.

This article originally appeared on TIME.

5 sentenced to death over burning of Christian couple in Kot Radha Kishan

 

5 sentenced to death over burning of Christian couple in Kot Radha Kishan

LAHORE: An anti-terrorism court (ATC) sentenced five people to death Wednesday over the killing of a Christian couple who were lynched and burned in a kiln after being falsely accused of blasphemy.

The deaths of Shahzad Masih and Shama Bibi caused outrage in the country and saw other Christian families living near their home in Punjab flee the area in fear. The illiterate couple had been falsely accused of tossing out pages of the Holy Quran along with the rubbish.

Blasphemy is a sensitive issue in Pakistan, with allegations often prompting mob violence. Critics say the laws are abused to wage personal vendettas, often against Christians.

Witnesses described how an angry mob of hundreds of people set upon the couple near the town of Kot Radha Kishan in Punjab in 2014, attacking them and then throwing their bodies into a brick kiln. It is unclear whether they were still alive when tossed into the kiln.

PEMRA bans 11 ‘illegal’ Christian TV channels across country

Riaz Anjum, the lawyer representing the couple’s family, said a total of 103 people had been charged in the case. But the court in the eastern city of Lahore had acquitted 90, including the owner of the brick kiln. He had been accused of locking the couple up as they tried to flee for fear they would default on their debt to him.

Apart from the five sentenced to hang, eight others were given two years’ imprisonment. “The five people awarded the death sentence were involved in dragging, beating and burning the couple while the other eight played a supportive role according to the judgement,” Anjum said. Senior prosecutor Khurram Khan confirmed the ruling.

Police have traditionally been reluctant to clamp down on mob violence for fear of enraging Islamists, a fact not lost upon the relatives of the deceased. It was not clear when the death sentences would be carried out. After the attack it emerged that the couple had been falsely accused.

Shahzad’s father, a faith healer who used pages with inscriptions in many languages for his work, had died shortly before the incident. The family was burning documents that belonged to him.

In German schools, steep learning curve for refugees and teachers

In German schools, steep learning curve for refugees and teachers

 

For 15-year-old Mustafa, the trickiest part about learning German is knowing when to use the articles der, die or das.

“And the umlaut,” his classmate Majd reminds him, sending both Syrian teens groaning in mock frustration at the vowel alteration, one of the quirks of German grammar.

But they’re not really complaining. Having escaped the fighting at home and survived the harrowing journey to Europe, they are glad to be back in school. For them, as for young refugees everywhere, it’s the first step back to a normal life. But they are fast learning that the hard work is only just beginning — for pupils and teachers alike.

Mustafa, Majd and their families were among the nearly 900,000 migrants who streamed into Germany last year. Around a third of them were minors, and the country now faces the Herculean task of absorbing the newcomers into its school system. The obstacles are formidable. Most of the youngsters don’t speak a word of German on arrival and have usually missed months, if not years, of school. Many are also scarred by the experiences that led them to flee their homes in the first place.

“It’s a huge challenge,” said Ilka Hoffmann, a board member of the GEW, Germany’s largest teachers’ union.

She estimates Germany will have to hire some 24,000 new teachers to cope with the influx, and that’s without including the urgent need for more psychologists and counsellors in schools.

“Trauma manifests itself in different ways,” Hoffmann told AFP. “We’re ill-prepared in that regard.” The Kultusministerkonferenz, a grouping of the nation’s state education ministries, has calculated that educating the child refugees will cost an extra 2.3 billion euros ($2.5 billion) a year.

In German classrooms today, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s “Wir schaffen das” (We can do it) motto about integrating the migrants is more than just a catchphrase. It’s a daily assignment.

Mustafa and Majd are enrolled in the Heinrich-von-Brentano school in Hochheim, a picturesque town west of Frankfurt. To cope with the refugee arrivals, the school has set up two so-called “intensive classes” for 22 pupils where the immediate focus is on learning German, the same approach that has been taken nationwide.

In Mustafa’s small classroom, where most of the students are from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, the atmosphere is jovial, but their teacher Michael Smiraglia says there’s no denying the daily difficulties. With pupils ranging from the gifted to those who are still learning the Latin alphabet, Smiraglia has to tailor his lessons to a range of levels and come up with several approaches to the same exercises.

Then there’s the added challenge of working with teens who have lived through traumatic events, which can trigger disruptive or antisocial behaviour.

“I quickly found that the name ‘intensive class’ also meant it would be intense for me as a teacher,” Smiraglia told AFP, while his pupils, in halting German, read out a dialogue about ordering lemonade and ice cream.

He says his background as a family counsellor, which saw him work with traumatised youths, has proved “immensely helpful” in bonding with the class.

“I have pupils aged 12 to 15 who have feared for their lives,” the bespectacled, soft-spoken teacher says, stressing the importance of giving the teens a safe place to share their stories.

“It’s a gift for me when they open up to me because it helps me understand them better and deal with things like inappropriate behaviour.”

For the students the real test of their progress will come when they move on from the cocoon of the intensive class to regular classes, where teachers have a curriculum to follow and may not have the time or tools to focus on their individual needs. To ease the transition, the Brentano school’s refugee pupils already spend several hours a week with their German peers for lessons such as English, maths or sports.

The results are mixed, with Mustafa pointing out that language remains a barrier. “The teachers speak so fast, I don’t understand much.” But the mingling has helped break the ice between the newcomers and their German schoolmates, as has playing football during break times. “We play together and then we also learn a bit more German,” says Mustafa.

Generally, though, the teens in the intensive classes admit they tend to stick together in their free time, speaking in their native tongues.

“I don’t have a lot of contact yet with the German kids,” says 14-year-old Marjan from Afghanistan. “But everyone is very friendly.”

She says one of the biggest differences with her old school is that boys and girls here are in the same classroom. “But it’s good,” she adds. “We understand each other better when we learn together.”

Mustafa is not yet convinced. “Boys and girls (together)… the boy is all ‘I love you’ and then he can’t study. Am I wrong?” he asks, flashing another goofy smile as his classmates burst out laughing. With their education slowly back on track, the teens are cautiously making plans for the future.

Mustafa says he wants to be a pilot, but only because he can’t see a career in his true passion, karate. Marjan is hesitating between becoming a lawyer or a make-up artist.

Majd, in a determined voice, says: “I will graduate and become a police officer.”

source The Express Tribune news

8 killed as Indian forces target passenger bus near LoC

8 killed as Indian forces target passenger bus near LoC

 

ISPR earlier said Indian forces resorted to firing and shelling in Shahkot, Jura, Battal Karela, Bagh, Bagsar and hot spring sectors targeting civilian population. Pakistani troops targeting Indian posts. Intense exchange of firing continues, it added.

The deceased were identified as Mukhtar Shah, Muhammad Younas, Ahmad and Arif Mustafai while body of a child is yet to be identified. Those injured in the incident were identified as Raja Gulfam, driver of the coach, police personnel Bashir Ahmad, Shafi Bhat, Sultan, Fazl Hussain, Manzoor Ahmad, Jawad Sultan, Imran and Sharafat Shah.

In a similar incident, a motorcyclist died after being hit by an Indian mortal shell in Karen area of Neelum valley.

Meanwhile, Speaker AJK legislative assembly Shah Ghulam Qadir condemned the Indian army attack and termed it aggression of the military establishment.

He appealed to the United Nations Military Observers Group for India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP) stationed in Muzaffarabad and Rawalpindi to take the notice of killing of civilians on the LoC.

On Monday, four civilians were killed and 10 others were injured in different sectors along the de facto border while six Indian soldiers were also confirmed dead in retaliatory fire.

Later on the same day, Indian Deputy High Commissioner JP Singh was summoned to the Foreign Office in protest of the violation.

Modi has learnt what Pakistan is capable of: army chief

On November 16, Army chief General Raheel Sharif said Indian premier Narendra Modi must have fully realised by now what Pakistan’s armed forces were capable of and that aggression is counterproductive.

The two countries have been at loggerheads since the killing of a populist rebel leader Burhan Wani by the occupied forces in the valley on July 8.

India also accuses Pakistan of being involved in an attack on an army base in Uri on September 18, in which 19 Indian soldiers were killed. Islamabad has denied the charge, which Delhi leveled without any substantial investigation or evidence.

Frequent incidents of cross-border fire have been witnessed since a heightened situation in occupied.

 

India also accuses Pakistan of being involved in an attack on an army base in Uri on September 18, in which 19 Indian soldiers were killed. Islamabad has denied the charge, which Delhi leveled without any substantial investigation or evidence.

Frequent incidents of cross-border fire have been witnessed since a heightened situation in occupied Kashmir. More than 100 protesters have lost their lives to the security forces in the valley while dozens blinded by use of pellet guns.

 

Canada: Montreal Ahmadiyya Muslim Women host ‘Ladies Only’ Annual Peace Conference

Canada: Montreal Ahmadiyya Muslim Women host ‘Ladies Only’ Annual Peace Conference

This event is designed by women, for women only. There will also be opportunities to visit kiosks from various peace organizations and to engage with the speakers of those various organisations.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Women’s Association of Montreal welcomes the Montreal community through its 8th edition of its annual peace conference.

Focusing on the theme, ‘Peace in the World – Our Contribution’, the event aims to showcase the role of women and their dedication to achieving peace in the world through their services to humanity.

This event is designed by women, for women only. There will also be opportunities to visit kiosks from various peace organizations and to engage with the speakers of those various organizations.

  • Name of the event: Ahmadiyya Muslim Association presents, Annual Peace Conference
  • Date: Sunday December 4th, 2016
  • Time: Registrations begin at 1:30PM and the main event will be between 2:00PM and 3:30PM. Free meetings with other women and visits to the kiosks are scheduled from 3:30PM.
  • Address of the event: Ahmadiyya Islamic Center Of Montreal – 9899 Saint Michel Boulevard, Montreal, QC H1H 5G7

A free drop-in day care service and snacks are offered to our guests. Parking is also available free of charge.

Name of the organization hosting the event & contact information:
Name:Sarah Cherki
Email:Sarah.cherki@gmail.com
Telephone: 418-262-2904

Read original post here: Canada: Montreal Ahmadiyya Muslim Women present, ‘Ladies Only’ Annual Peace Conference

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

Indonesia’s Abusive Blasphemy Law Under Fresh Scrutiny | Phelim Kine

Indonesia’s Abusive Blasphemy Law Under Fresh Scrutiny | Phelim Kine

Recent targets of the blasphemy law include three former leaders of the Gafatar religious community following the violent forced eviction of more than 7,000 members of the group from their homes on Kalimantan island earlier this year. 

“The blasphemy law also has been used as the legal basis for a number of government regulations that facilitate official discrimination on the basis of religion.”

Blasphemy charges recently brought against the governor of Indonesia’s capital city have sparked renewed calls for the repeal of the abusive law.

Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama, a Christian, was charged on November 16 in connection with a reference he made to a Quranic verse in late September. The Indonesia Legal Aid Foundation reiterated a call by Indonesian human rights activists for the repeal of the blasphemy law because of the threat it poses to the country’s religious minorities.

Indonesia’s blasphemy law, article 156a of the Indonesian criminal code, punishes deviations from the central tenets of the six officially recognized religions with up to five years in prison. The blasphemy law has been used to prosecute and imprison members of religious minorities and of traditional religions. Recent targets of the blasphemy law include three former leaders of the Gafatar religious community following the violent forced eviction of more than 7,000 members of the group from their homes on Kalimantan island earlier this year.

The blasphemy law also has been used as the legal basis for a number of government regulations that facilitate official discrimination on the basis of religion. These include a June 2008 government decree that ordered members of the Ahmadiyah religious community to cease all public religious activities on the grounds that they deviated from the principal teachings of Islam and threatened violators with up to five years in prison.

President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo should take seriously his pledge to promote religious pluralism in Indonesia and work to have this law and others like it taken off the books.
Read original post here: Indonesia’s Abusive Blasphemy Law Under Fresh Scrutiny | Phelim Kine

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

Indonesia: President Joko Widodo says he’ll stop ‘growth of radicalism’

Indonesia: President Joko Widodo says he’ll stop ‘growth of radicalism’

National Police Chief Tito Karnavian warned on Monday of a threat to parliament during rallies expected this Friday and on Dec. 2.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo said on Tuesday he was determined to “prevent the growth of radicalism”, after reports that Islamist extremists are planning protests to destabilise his government.

Officials say there has been mounting alarm in the government since more than 100,000 Muslims, led by hardline Islamists, took to the streets of Jakarta on Nov. 4 to demand the removal of the capital’s governor, a Christian, for alleged blasphemy.

National Police Chief Tito Karnavian warned on Monday of a threat to parliament during rallies expected this Friday and on Dec. 2.

“There are hidden methods by certain groups to enter and occupy parliament,” Indonesian media quoted him as saying.

“If (these actions) are intended to overthrow the government, that’s a violation of the law.”

Widodo has blamed “political actors” for fanning violence during the Nov. 4 protest, without naming anyone.

[more …]

Read original post here: Indonesian president says he’ll stop ‘growth of radicalism’

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

USA: NAACP Issues Statement on Proposed ‘Muslim Registry’

USA: NAACP Issues Statement on Proposed ‘Muslim Registry’

For democracy to become real for all members of our nation, we all must learn to stand in solidarity with any subjugated groups and embrace the risks of doing so. 

BALTIMORE, MD. – The following is a statement from Cornell William Brooks, President and CEO of the NAACP:

“The NAACP resolutely condemns President-elect Trump’s proposed plans for a ‘Muslim registry.’

Our nation’s history contains far too many horrific examples of the oppression and demonization of groups based on religion, race, origin or political affiliation, and we refuse to sit by silently and allow for the creation of new ones.

The President-elect may have run a campaign based on the faulty assumption that only through a return to the racialized polarization of the past can America be great again, but those of us who know our history and have a memory of that ugly past will fight with every inch of our spirit to not go back.

While slavery, genocide, segregation and internment have strained our ideals of democracy and inclusion, those same ideals yet inspire the NAACP’s work in streets, media and courts.

For over a century, the NAACP has battled against racism to secure equality for all American citizens. President-elect Trump’s proposed registry – a digital ‘stop and frisk’ for Muslim Americans – is the latest threat to the liberty of all Americans. The NAACP stands with our civil rights organization partners in denouncing any ‘Muslim registry’ and in the ongoing fight against the persecution of any Americans.

For democracy to become real for all members of our nation, we all must learn to stand in solidarity with any subjugated groups and embrace the risks of doing so.

That is why I, as a proud Christian and card-carrying member of the NAACP, have joined with my dear Jewish colleague, Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, in vowing that, should President-elect Trump’s threat of a ‘Muslim registry’ come to fruition, we will not hesitate to sign up. In the meantime, the NAACP will continue to stand in staunch opposition to any attempt to register and reduce anyone to noncitizen and nonhuman status.”

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Founded Feb. 12. 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest, largest and most widely recognized grassroots–based civil rights organization. Its more than half-million members and supporters throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities, conducting voter mobilization and monitoring equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.

Read original post here: USA: NAACP Issues Statement on Proposed ‘Muslim Registry’

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.