Iranian general says son might kill Saudi king to claim throne

Iranian general says son might kill Saudi king to claim throne

Iranian general says son might kill Saudi king to claim throne

A powerful Iranian general has been quoted suggesting that Saudi Arabia’s deputy crown prince is so “impatient” he may kill his own father to claim the throne, Associated Press reports.

His comments come as Saudi Arabia conducts naval drills in the strategic Strait of Hormuz.

Obama hosts powerful Saudi prince

Unforgiving rhetoric has been common between the two countries since January. However, the remarks by the Revolutionary Guards General Qassem Soleimani’s take things to an entirely different level by suggesting regicide.

Soleimani made the comments late on Wednesday at a mourning ceremony for an Iranian general killed in Syria, The Fars and Tasnimnews agencies report.

Relations between majority Shia Iran and Sunni Saudi Arabia went downhill after the January 2 ransacking of the Saudi embassy in Tehran and the Saudi consulate in Mashhad.

Iran bans all products from Saudi Arabia after ties cut

The ransacking came amid anger over Riyadh’s execution of Nimr al-Nimr, a prominent cleric from the kingdom’s Shia minority. Following the execution Riyadh severed diplomatic relations with Tehran. Several Arab countries followed suit and severed or reduced relations with Iran.

This article originally appeared on ABC News

Canada, University of Calgary, investigates , disturbing , anti-Muslim, posters,

Canada: University of Calgary investigates disturbing anti-Muslim posters

Canada: University of Calgary investigates disturbing anti-Muslim posters

About 40 posters were discovered by students at 6:45 a.m. Tuesday, filled with hateful and obscene language telling Muslims to “keep your barbaric ways … in your 7th century homeland.”

With fear and anger elevated after anti-Muslim posters were found at the University of Calgary on Tuesday, officials say campus security will be reviewed to ensure students feel safe.

“It’s truly disturbing and makes me personally very angry,” said U of C president Elizabeth Cannon, stressing that the university is checking surveillance video and working closely with police to find those responsible.

“This is something we’ll have to evaluate. We have terrific campus security, our students do feel safe and we take pride in our programs, like safe walk, cameras and just looking out for each other.

“But we do want to analyze this and see if there is more that we can do.”

About 40 posters were discovered by students at 6:45 a.m. Tuesday, filled with hateful and obscene language telling Muslims to “keep your barbaric ways … in your 7th century homeland.”

While campus security acted quickly to take them down, other posters and similar hate literature was also found later in parking lots and in residential mailboxes just outside of campus in northwest communities.

“This is my campus, my community, but part of me feels very scared now,” said Lobna Al-Wadeih, a female Muslim student who wears a hijab.

“With my hijab, I feel like my being Muslim is kind of in your face. And out there, if I’m downtown or something, I will get that, I will get the ‘go home,’ from people.

“But you’ve got to try to have a positive mindset and realize that someone who is an enemy today might be a friend tomorrow.”

U of C officials and Muslim student groups reacted quickly, adamant they are part of a diverse and welcoming campus, and encouraging the creators of the posters to become educated and informed about Islam.

“It’s easy to hate and to be misinformed, because it takes a lot of work to actually be informed,” said Moonis Ahmed, president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Students Association.

“We’re working hard at U of C to create a positive dialogue, and I would invite anyone, even people who feel such hatred, to reach out and ask us questions so we can have that dialogue with them.”

Umair Tazeem, president of the Muslim Students’ Association, says Tuesday’s discovery of the hateful posters would be especially difficult for students who clearly appear Muslim.

“I don’t wear a scarf, you can’t always tell if I’m a Muslim. But for those that do, this is tougher,” Tazeem said, also welcoming anyone with concerns about Islam to come talk to his association.

“I know there are a lot of bad things happening around the world right now. But that is not a representation of Islam.”

Naveid Dar, a student with the Faith and Spirituality Centre, said when he first saw the posters online he felt “beyond appalled.”

“It’s really upsetting. You get up in the morning, you think it’s going to be a good day but, then, in terms of negative feelings, you go from zero to one hundred in a second.

“We are all human beings, we all live in the same community.”

Those responsible for the posters could face a number of criminal charges.

Under certain sections of the Criminal Code of Canada, inciting hate propaganda against any identifiable group can result in a maximum jail time of five years.

Tuesday’s posters mark the second time in two weeks that hateful literature was distributed on a university campus in Alberta.

On Sept. 19, 12 posters were found at the University of Alberta featuring a picture of a Sikh man, profanity about turbans and a statement calling on people from developing nations’ cultures to leave Canada.

Read original post here: Canada: University of Calgary investigates disturbing anti-Muslim posters

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

New Zealand: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community to hold Mosque Open Day

New Zealand: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community to hold Mosque Open Day

New Zealand: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community to hold Mosque Open Day

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community New Zealand will open its mosque doors at 20 Dalgety Drive in Wiri Manukau, for the general public on Saturday 8th Oct 2016 from 10 am to 4 pm.  The event forms part of the community’s continuous desire to build bridges and increase understanding amongst members of all faiths.

‘The mosque plays a central role in developing a Muslim’s bond to its creator. It provides a place of worship, as well as a hub for the local Muslim community to come together. Lately though, the true image of a mosque has been greatly tarnished worldwide by some individuals using a house of worship in a way totally opposite to the true Islamic teachings, and serving as a source to divide people, rather than bring them together’, says Mr Bashir Khan, the National President of the Community. ‘The only way to remove this perceived image is to invite our fellow citizens to come and experience the true purpose of a Mosque in person’.

The Spiritual Leader and Head of the Worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad has reminded the community of this purpose on several occasions. At a recent opening ceremony of a mosque in Sweden he said, “It is quite natural to fear the unknown and so the neighbors may well be concerned that the peace and security of their hometown may be disturbed now that this Mosque has been opened. However, based on the Islam that I know and follow, let me reassure you that this Mosque will prove itself to be a fountain of peace, from which only everlasting springs of love and compassion will gush forth.” He further said, “A basic purpose of a Mosque is to serve as a place for Muslims to offer their prayers and in Arabic the word for prayer is ‘As-Salat’ which in essence means ‘compassion, love and mercy’. Consequently, a Muslim who offers his prayers with sincerity is a person who is kind, caring and merciful and he or she is a person who strives to stay away from immorality, illegal activity and all forms of evil.”

The community’s Auckland mosque, named Baitul Muqeet, is the largest purpose built mosque in New Zealand. The open day will feature guided tours of the mosque, short seminars and presentations to answer any queries, as well as an exhibition and free literature for visitors. Refreshments will be available through out the day.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is a dynamic, fast-growing international revival movement within Islam. Founded in 1889 by Hadhrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (1835-1908) in Punjab, India, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community spans over 206 countries with membership exceeding tens of millions. Its motto of ‘Love for all and hatred for none’ is evidenced through the peaceful actions of its millions of followers. The New Zealand branch of this community was established in 1987 and has just over 400 members. It is a registered charitable organisation and endeavors to be an active and integrated community within New Zealand society.
— New Zealand: Ahmadiyya Muslim Community to hold Mosque Open Day

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

UK: Ahmadiyya Muslim youths enjoy a weekend at Kingsley

UK: Ahmadiyya Muslim youths enjoy a weekend at Kingsley

The sight of the large tented village being erected on the site had prompted concerns from some local people about traffic problems before the event began, but none had been reported as The Messenger went to press last week.

young men and boys from the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association UK spent a busy weekend in Kingsley recently at the largest youth convention ever held in the UK.

The youngsters came from across the country to the site, on land behind Country Market, for a weekend of study, discussion, sport and friendship.

Farooq Aftab, general secretary of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association UK, said the object of the event was to support and encourage young men from across the country in their faith and its aims of spreading peace and friendship around the world.

The event saw around 5,000 men and boys travelling from as far afield as Scotland and the Midlands, to enjoy three days of work and sport.

The youngsters started the weekend by listening to a sermon by Caliph Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, broadcast live from the association’s mosque in Morden. The evening continued with prayer, workshops and sport. On the Saturday the visitors enjoyed more workshops, plus an open-air feast. The attendees also pledged allegiance to the UK at a special flag-raising ceremony. As well as the sporting competitions and study time, the youngsters visited an exhibition tent which provided a showcase for the group’s outreach work around the world; particularly its work to improve the living conditions of both Christian and Muslim communities in parts of Africa.

The sight of the large tented village being erected on the site had prompted concerns from some local people about traffic problems before the event began, but none had been reported as The Messenger went to press last week.

Mr Aftab said the group was keen to work with local people, and support local businesses.

A spokesman for East Hampshire District Council said the group had informed the authority of its plans but EHDC didn’t need to be involved with any licensing issues as no licenses had been required, given the nature of the event.

Last weekend was the turn of the ladies and elders of the group, who met for three days of study and friendship.

Read original post here: UK: Ahmadiyya Muslim youths enjoy a weekend at Kingsley

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.