Nato weapons recovered from home in Karachi: police

Nato weapons recovered from home in Karachi: police

Nato weapons recovered from home in Karachi: police

KARACHI: Police on Wednesday claimed to have recovered a huge cache of Nato arms and ammunitions during a raid on an empty house in the city’s Azizabad area.

Police seized a large number of weapons, including anti-aircraft guns, sub-machine guns, light machine guns, rifles and rocket launchers, in the raid. Bulletproof jackets and helmets were also recovered from a water tank.

The raid was conducted after the police was tipped off by a political worker already in custody.

All weapons recovered have been taken into custody at the office of Sindh Inspector General (IG) AD Khawaja.

Facebook Messenger offers 'Secret Conversations' facility for all users

Facebook Messenger offers ‘Secret Conversations’ facility for all users

Facebook Messenger offers ‘Secret Conversations’ facility for all users

Six months after WhatsApp enabled end-to-end encryption for its billion users, Facebook has finally followed suit, rolling out the same encryption on its Messenger.

The app now allows users to converse with their friends and family without the fear of being monitored by not only hackers or government agencies but also Facebook itself. It is a huge relief for users given the recent development that Yahoo handed over emails of its users to US intelligence agencies.

Yahoo secretly scanned customer emails for US intelligence

A Facebook spokesperson told WIRED that the company just finished rolling out “Secret Conversations” to all 900 million Facebook Messenger users in the past few weeks.

Although the company’s software updates for iOS and Android have not mentioned the encryption feature, anyone who updates their Messenger app will now find the “secret” option on the top right of the “new message” screen.

Google’s new chat app should never be used, warns Snowden

You can activate the Messenger’s new encryption feature by tapping on a user’s name in any regular chat. ‘Secret Conversations’ feature needs to be enabled manually for each and every chat and it can only be activated if both participants have the latest version of the app installed on their devices.

After enabling the feature, you have the option of setting a self-destruct timer on your messages — anywhere from five seconds to a day.

However, the encryption is not available for group chats and it does not support GIFs and videos, though you can still share pictures and use stickers.

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to start a Secret Conversations

This article originally appeared on Wired

Two Pakistani , ventures, to participate, in Oslo Startup , Challenge, v

Two Pakistani ventures to participate in Oslo Startup Challenge

Two Pakistani ventures to participate in Oslo Startup Challenge

Two Pakistani startups have been selected to participate at the Oslo Startup Challenge in Norway.

Whisper O and Micorpower Labs, the two startups that were incubated at The Nest i/O, on the basis of their unique ideas, have won the international recognition and a chance to participate in the Oslo Startup Challenge.

‘Fitbit for cows’ wins big at Islamabad start-up competition

Teams from both the startups have been invited to take a fully-paid trip to Norway, where they will participate in a month-long free-of-cost incubation program. The startups would avail this opportunity to get investments and support from the Norwegian government.

Micropower Labs has also been selected for ‘Amazon Launchpad’, as their product ‘Flash Pack’ will be made available under special startups category on Amazon. The device is a Power-Bank that charges up in just 14 minutes from your own laptop charger and packs up enough power to last you for a whole day.

Don’t throw away your toothpaste tubes or shoeboxes. This startup will pay for it

Whisper O is an online application that aims to provide people with a platform to share their stories through sound. The app is dedicated to bringing out memories, nostalgia and smiles through connecting different sounds to different spaces. On the other hand, Micropower Labs is a technology innovation company, focused on creating next-generation devices and gadgets for a day-to-day use.

FIFA extends Chile ban for homophobic chants

FIFA extends Chile ban for homophobic chants

FIFA extends Chile ban for homophobic chants

ZURICH: 

A fresh bout of homophobic chanting from fans at a Chile match has seen FIFA extend a home stadium ban on the continental champions to three games.

In May, football’s world governing body slapped Chile with a ban on playing at its Estadio Nacional Julio Martinez Pradanos in Santiago for two matches over a previous charges of homophobic chanting from the terraces, forcing them to play at a different stadium.

FIFA propose fine in 2006 World Cup bid probe

The extra stadium ban will be served at the 2018 World Cup qualifying match home to Venezuela in March 2017.

Chile coach Juan Antonio Pizzi’s squad includes the likes of Arsenal forward Alexis Sanchez, Bayern Munich midfielder Arturo Vidal and Manchester City goalkeeper Claudio Bravo.

But his side, the Copa America champions, are currently seventh in the South American qualifying group.

FIFA protests seizure of football office in Kuwait

Other incidents of poor crowd behaviour saw Honduras, Salvador, Mexico, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Peru, Italy and Albania all pick up nominal fines from a FIFA disciplinary committee.

source tribune express

Rooney wants united approach after Allardyce exit

Rooney wants united approach after Allardyce exit

LONDON: 

Wayne Rooney has called on England’s stars to stick together as they get back to work following Sam Allardyce’s shock departure.

Allardyce was forced to resign as England manager after just 67 days and one game in charge following his controversial comments to undercover newspaper reporters investigating football corruption.

Gareth Southgate will server as England’s interim boss for the next four matches and one of his first decisions was to retain Manchester United striker Rooney as his captain.

Rooney is set to lead England in Saturday’s World Cup qualifier against Malta at Wembley and the 30-year-old is eager to focus on football after a difficult period for the national side.

“We need to build on the three points we won in the last game (against Slovakia), and the other side of it isn’t our issue, it’s nothing for us to be concerned about,” Rooney said on Tuesday. “It’s a shame, everyone could see how excited Sam was for the job and he came in and showed that enthusiasm to the players.

Sam Allardyce could face ban: Football Association

The Manchester United captain continued, “As a group of players we need to stick together and concentrate on the football. For the FA I’m sure it has been a tough couple of weeks but for the players we’ve been with our clubs and we have to focus on the games.”

The start of Rooney’s England career intersected briefly with the end of Southgate’s international days just over a decade ago.

And Rooney backed the temporary appointment of the England Under-21 boss as the ideal solution to a difficult situation.

“When I first got into the squad he was in the squad then. He’s done a very job with the Under-21s, and he’s got an opportunity to show what he can do at senior level,” Rooney added.

England players get postcards from sacked Allardyce

Rooney’s role with England has been under heavy scrutiny since his lacklustre displays during a disappointment Euro 2016 campaign.

Relieved that Southgate remains firmly on his side, Rooney hopes to repay his faith against Malta and then Slovenia in another qualifier next Tuesday.

The 30-year-old striker added, “There was a lot of talk over whether I’d be captain or not, so it was good Gareth put that to bed quite early and there wasn’t the speculation. We’ve got two games this week that we have to win. Whether that was with Gareth or Sam we have to try and get six points. If we do that Gareth will be happy and we’ll be happy.”

 

Pakistan barred from Kabaddi World Cup in India

Pakistan barred from Kabaddi World Cup in India

NEW DELHI: 

The 12-nation Kabaddi World Cup kicks off this week in India, with a row over a decision to bar arch-rivals Pakistan from competing threatening to overshadow the tag-wrestling sport’s showcase event.Formidable Iran clash with newcomers the United States in Friday’s opening round of the competition that also includes top sides from Australia, South Korea, England, Poland, Kenya and Argentina.

Pakistan beat India in 2016 Asia Kabaddi cup final

With the World Cup last staged nine years ago, teams are relishing the chance to compete in the two-week event being held in India’s western city of Ahmedabad.

But the traditional South Asian sport that mixes tag and wrestling and is growing in popularity has been hit with controversy over a decision to exclude highly fancied Pakistan.

International Kabaddi Federation (IKF) chief Deoraj Chaturvedi, who is from India, said Pakistan has been denied entry because of a spike in tensions between the two nuclear-armed nations.

“This is not the right time to engage with Pakistan,” Chaturvedi told AFP.

“Pakistan is a valuable member of the IKF but looking at the current scenario and in the best interest of both the nations, we decided that Pakistan must be refrained from the championship.”

Pakistan accused the IKF of unfairly targeting the country, saying both rival nations should have been excluded if there were security concerns.

“We have called a meeting to discuss this issue but let me tell you that a Kabaddi World Cup is no world cup without Pakistan,” said Pakistan kabaddi federation secretary Rana Muhammad Sarwar. “This is just like a football world cup without Brazil,” Sarwar told AFP.

Pakistan captain Nasir Ali said his players had been favourites to clinch the cup after defeating India at the six-nation Kabaddi Cup held in Pakistan in May and last month’s Asian Beach Games in Vietnam.

Kabaddi Cup in full swing at Wah

“We were hoping to win the world cup in India by beating India,” Ali told AFP, adding that fans were being denied matches between the top two sides.

Hostilities between the nations have flared after India said last week it conducted military strikes inside Pakistan against militants, sparking fury from Islamabad.

The strikes came after gunmen staged the deadliest attack on an Indian army base in more than a decade, which an enraged New Delhi blamed on Pakistani-based militants.

Indian chief wants more kabaddi events

The World Cup comes as the ancient game, played in sandy parks across India for generations and once tagged with a dowdy image, is enjoying a new lease of life.

The Pro Kabaddi League, launched in India in 2014 with live television coverage, corporate sponsors and brightly coloured lyrca strips, has proved hugely popular and drawn players from Iran and South Korea.

Iran’s skipper Meraj Sheykh, who has played in the league’s last three editions, said his side had grown stronger by playing in India and other international tournaments.

“We have more young players playing for us now and they have the experience of playing in India,” Sheykh told the Times of India newspaper.

Kabaddi requires yoga-like breathing skills as two seven-member teams send a raider into their enemy’s half of the court to tag an opponent before returning — in just one breath.

Attackers chant “kabaddi, kabaddi” to prove they are not inhaling.

The game is played in around 35 countries, but it is dominated by India, where it originated.

Iran, who lost to India in the previous two world cup finals in 2007 and 2004, have a relatively easy first match against first-timers USA.

An opening-day double header will also see India lock horns with South Korea. A round-robin tournament, the top two sides from the pools will qualify for the semis, with the final on October 22.

Source The express tribune

Kerry urges Taliban to reach peace with Kabul

Kerry urges Taliban to reach peace with Kabul

Kerry urges Taliban to reach peace with Kabul

BRUSSELS: 

US Secretary of State John Kerry on Wednesday urged Afghanistan’s Taliban militants to follow the recent example of a notorious warlord and make an “honourable” peace with the Kabul government.

“There is a path toward an honourable end to the conflict that the Taliban have waged — it is a conflict that cannot be won on the battlefield,” Kerry told an international donor conference in Brussels.

World powers seek billions more dollars to keep Afghanistan running

Kerry said a peace deal signed last month by Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, who heads the Hezb-i-Islami group and was a key figure in Afghanistan’s civil war in the 1990s, was a “model for what might be possible.”

“The message for the Taliban would be: take note,” he said.

Kerry added that a peace deal would in fact achieve the Taliban’s aim of expelling foreign forces from Afghanistan, 15 years after a US-led invasion drove the Islamist group from power.

At least six killed, 35 wounded in Afghanistan market blast

“A political settlement negotiated with the Afghan government is the only way to end the fighting, ensure lasting stability, and achieve a full drawdown of international military forces, which is their goal,” he said.

“Their goal of ridding Afghanistan of external forces will not come by the continued insurgency, it will come by peace.”

Source the Express tribune

USA: Muslim Sect Reviled Abroad Seeks Acceptance

USA: Muslim Sect Reviled Abroad Seeks Acceptance

USA: Muslim Sect Reviled Abroad Seeks Acceptance

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association hosted a 5K run/walk to raise money for a local food bank and an international charity in Washington, D.C., Oct. 1, 2016.

NEW YORK — “This is true brotherhood. This is true love for humanity,” Hanan Shahid said. He was referring to the unique position that some Ahmadi Muslims now find themselves in: Persecuted in countries like Pakistan for not being “true” Muslims, members of the Ahmadiyya minority sect have long struggled for acceptance and the freedom to practice their version of Islam.

Here in America, where recent acts of violence and simmering Islamophobia have put many Muslims on edge, Ahmadi Muslim-Americans now find themselves representing and defending the very religion in which they themselves have not been fully accepted.

“It’s almost ironic that we’re fighting the battle for true Islam … [for] the Muslims that are out there that are denouncing us. … We are upholding the faith of Islam, which they believe in as well,” Shahid said.

Members of the New York chapter of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association turned out at Flushing Meadows Corona Park in New York City last week for a 5K run/walk.
The Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association hosted a 5K run/walk to raise money for a local food bank and an international charity in Washington, D.C., Oct. 1, 2016.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association hosted a 5K run/walk to raise money for a local food bank and an international charity in Washington, D.C., Oct. 1, 2016.

The Walk for Humanity, in the borough of Queens, was organized to raise money for hunger charities and was one of five simultaneous races run Oct. 1. The other races were held in Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, Houston, Texas, and Zion, Illinois. The outings were as much an opportunity to do good as they were to raise awareness for the Ahmadiyya community.

‘Helping mankind’ is their message

“We believe that giving the right message of Islam is very important, and the right message of Islam is humanity and helping mankind,” said Zeshan Hamid, vice president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association. “We do get affected by the Islamophobia that’s going around,” he continued. “We look to cure that by communicating with people.”

Attiyah Malik attended with her husband and two children.

“Peace is a really big part of our culture, our faith and the way we live our lives,” she said As a child of Pakistani immigrants fleeing persecution, Malik appreciates the religious freedoms America afforded her and her family.

“That’s why so many people come here, because you can believe what you want, and as long as you’re peaceful, you have a home,” Malik said.

Recent bombings in New York and New Jersey upset her, she said, because they allegedly were staged by a U.S. citizen of Afghan descent.

“I’m an American. I was born here. I was raised here … [and] someone attacked my country,” Malik said. “So that hurts. And then someone used my religion, which for me is intrinsically personal.”

Many of the Ahmadi Muslims gathered in Queens were quick to point out the motto of their community: “Love for all, hatred for none.”

The Ahmadiyya sect was founded in 1889 by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad. His followers believe he was the second coming of the Messiah. This belief is a departure from that of mainstream Muslims, who consider Muhammad to be the last prophet of God.

‘Violence not the answer’

A mainstream Muslim himself, Imam Mustafa El-Amin of the Masjid Ibrahim (mosque) in Newark, New Jersey, said more violence is not the answer.

“When you see the long history of Shiites and Sunnis [the two largest denominations of Islam] and you see the violence, the killing, you see that controversy for hundreds of years,” the imam said. “… Looking at that reality and [then] when I look at the Ahmadiyya community, as I look at the Jewish community, the Christian community, it really should be about all of us coexisting peacefully and in harmony, although we may have different views of religion and different views of the world.”

“In Islam, we are taught that only God can judge who is and isn’t a Muslim,” added 30-year-old Salaam Bhatti, who won Saturday’s race in New York. “We’re supposed to just be competing against each other in good works, and let God decide at the end of the day.”
Read original post here: USA: Muslim Sect Reviled Abroad Seeks Acceptance

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.

UK: London's first mosque – archive | The Guardian

UK: London’s first mosque – archive | The Guardian

UK: London’s first mosque – archive | The Guardian

“I am absolutely in the dark as to the real cause, and so, I believe, is his Highness the Emir. It is said that the King has been given to understand that the mosque is not a Moslem mosque, which is a patent absurdity. I believe that he has been misinformed in some way.”

4 October 1926: After the opening ceremony the Imam called the faithful to prayer from the minarets high over the roofs of suburbia

Fleet Street, Sunday

There was a strange meeting of East and West at Southfields this afternoon, when the first mosque to be built in London was opened. The mosque, a graceful little building with a dome in concrete, is placed close to the District railway and in the midst of suburban villas. After the ceremony the Imam called the faithful to prayer from the minarets high over the roofs of suburbia. It is built altogether with steel and concrete, and, unlike the Eastern mosques, it has windows, as a concession to our climate. The architect is Mr. J. H. Mawson, of Lancaster, who, with his father, the well-known town planner, was able to study the architecture of mosques during the reconstruction of Salonika. It is in its incongruous surroundings a thing of beauty.

A special interest was aroused in today’s ceremony owing to the uncertainty up to the last moment whether the Emir Feisul, the Viceroy of Mecca – the second son of the King of the Hedjaz, now on a visit here, – would perform the opening ceremony. It had been stated that this was one of the chief objects of the Emir’s visit to England. A day or two ago the newspapers announced that Ibn Saud had telegraphed to his son forbidding him to fulfil the engagement, but this again was denied. The guests, on arriving to-day, found a notice displayed announcing that the Emir had been “prohibited” from opening the mosque, and that his place would be taken by Kahn Bahadur, the Sheik Abdul Qadir, a member of the Indian Delegation to the League of Nations. There was some excitement about this, and everyone was much disappointed not to see the handsome young prince.

The Emir’s letter

Even after the explanation given to the company by the Imam of the mosque, the mystery of the Emir was not properly cleared up. He said that he had received a letter from the Foreign Secretary to the Sultan – now in London with the Emir – regretfully informing him that the Emir would not be able to attend the ceremony. The Secretary added, “This is a matter which occasions his Highness very great regret, and both the Highness and myself wish all success to yourself and all prosperity and blessing to the Mosque.”

The Imam explained that the King of the Hedjaz, in reply to the invitation that he should send a representative, informed him that his son would come to London for the purpose. When the Emir reached London the programme was settled with his officials, but when all the arrangements were complete he saw in the press to his great surprise that the Emir had been forbidden to attend. On Saturday morning the Foreign Minister came to the mosque and explained that owing to some misunderstanding the King had instructed Feisal not to come. The Emir himself, said the Imam, believed the Ahmadiyya community was doing good work.

“I am,” added the Imam, “absolutely in the dark as to the real cause, and so, I believe, is his Highness the Emir. It is said that the King has been given to understand that the mosque is not a Moslem mosque, which is a patent absurdity. I believe that he has been misinformed in some way.”

The view taken in conversation by people in touch with the affair was that Ibn Saud has changed his mind about allowing his son to appear, owing to newspaper accounts of the London Ahmadiyya community. This community, as is well known, is extremely tolerant in its outlook towards other religions, and the point which has caused alarm is probably the statement that Christians would be welcomed. The King of the Hedjaz is the leader of the Wahabi sect of Mohammedans, who are extremely strict in their beliefs and practice. This, of course, does not explain why the original permission was given, for it is inconceivable that Ibn Saud was not well aware of the tenets of the Ahmadiyyans.

The ceremony


The ceremony this afternoon, when the black doors of the mosque were opened with a silver key, began with a recitation from the Koran and the murmuring of prayer. East and West met in the assembly – turbaned Orientals from all the sects of Mohammedanism, Indians of other religions, including the impressive Maharajah of Burdwan, members of foreign legations in London, and many prominent Englishmen who have had experience in the East. The Imam read a long message from Mirza Mahmud Ahmed Khalifatulmasih , the head of the community in the Punjab, who laid the foundation-stone of the mosque two years ago.

Read original post here: UK: London’s first mosque – archive

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.
Canada a sanctuary for Ahmadiyyas; community working hard to fit in

Canada a sanctuary for Ahmadiyyas; community working hard to fit in

Canada a sanctuary for Ahmadiyyas; community working hard to fit in

Members of the faith have been persecuted in places like Pakistan, Bangladesh and even in the U.K., where a Scottish shopkeeper was murdered by another Muslim man earlier this year in what a court heard was a sectarian attack.

Excerpts:

Thousands of members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community composed largely of immigrants lined the streets outside a mosque in Maple, Ont. on Monday night to wave, cheer and pray as their caliph, Mirza Masroor Ahmad, arrived.

The caliph last visited Toronto in 2012. He’s expected to remain in the city for several days.

That rejuvenation comes at a welcome time. This week, CBC News and the Angus Reid Institute released a poll showing that 68 per cent of Canadian respondents believe immigrants should be doing more to fit in, as opposed to keeping their own customs and languages.

The online survey was conducted in early September from a sample of 3,904 Canadians. The results have a 2.5 per cent margin of error 19 times out of 20.

Ahmadi Muslims are, it should be noted, especially motivated to fit in to Canadian society.

Members of the faith have been persecuted in places like Pakistan, Bangladesh and even in the U.K., where a Scottish shopkeeper was murdered by another Muslim man earlier this year in what a court heard was a sectarian attack.

In Canada, however, the group enjoys religious freedom.

“We’ve seen nothing but good here,” said Ata Haee, one of a number of young men helping journalists navigate through the whirl of festivities.

“We want to be a part of this country.”

Read original post here: Canada a sanctuary for Ahmadiyyas; community working hard to fit in

This content-post is archived for backup and to keep archived records of any news Islam Ahmadiyya. The views expressed by the author and source of this news archive do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of iRabwah. iRabwah is not an organ of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, nor in any way associated with any of the community’s official websites.