2nd Test: Kumar's fifer hands India advantage over New Zealand

2nd Test: Kumar’s fifer hands India advantage over New Zealand

2nd Test: Kumar’s fifer hands India advantage over New Zealand

KOLKATA: 

Bhuvneshwar Kumar picked up five wickets in a fine display of seam bowling to floor New Zealand after Wriddhiman Saha’s battling half-century helped India reach 316 on the second day of the second test at Eden Gardens on Saturday.

After India were dismissed shortly before lunch, their seamers did most of the damage as New Zealand staggered to 128 for seven at the close on a rain-interrupted day. BJ Watling (12) and Jeetan Patel (five) were at the crease for the touring side.

It was the fourth five-wicket haul for the 26-year-old Kumar, who replaced Umesh Yadav in the side. “In India you rarely get this kind of wicket, so I wanted to make full use of it,” Kumar told the host broadcaster. “It was one of my dreams to take five wickets in India.”

Kohli shrugs off rankings pressure for New Zealand Test

Mohammed Shami struck first, trapping opener Tom Latham (one) lbw, before out-of-sorts Martin Guptill (13) departed when the ball ricocheted off of his elbow and on to his stumps after he lifted his arms to avoid a sharply-rising Kumar delivery.

Henry Nicholls (one) was out soon after play resumed in the second session when the left-handed batsman chopped Kumar on to his stumps to reduce the Kiwis to 23-3.

Stand-in captain Ross Taylor (36) and Luke Ronchi (35) took the fight to the hosts with a 62-run fourth-wicket stand before the latter was trapped in front by left-arm spinner Jadeja.

Kane Williamson hit by bug ahead of second Test

New Zealand’s hopes rested heavily on Taylor’s shoulders with regular captain Kane Williamson absent due to illness, but after a two-and-half hour rain delay, the right-hander pushed hard at a Kumar outswinger to be caught at first slip.

Kumar completed his five-wicket haul by sending back Mitchell Santner (11) and Matt Henry (nought) in successive deliveries.

Earlier, resuming on 239-7, India, who lead the three-test series 1-0, added valuable runs through their lower-order batsmen, with Saha (54 not out) completing his third test fifty.

The 31-year-old Saha, who has cemented his place in India’s test side after the retirement of long-standing captain and wicketkeeper Mahendra Singh Dhoni, was struck on the elbow and the ribcage by some hostile New Zealand bowling.

But the right-hander did not flinch and brought up his fifty with a four and a six in successive deliveries off left-arm spinner Santner, much to the delight of the crowd, who applauded at length for the local player.

Saha added 41 for the eighth wicket with Jadeja (14) and another 35 for the final one with fellow home favourite

Source The Tribune

Deceased Israeli statesman Shimon Peres stopped attack on Iran

Deceased Israeli statesman Shimon Peres stopped attack on Iran

Deceased Israeli statesman Shimon Peres stopped attack on Iran

Shimon Peres, the former Israeli president and prime minister who died on Wednesday at 93, “stopped” Benjamin Netanyahu from launching an attack on Iran.

“I stopped Netanyahu from attacking Iran,” Peres was reported as telling Steve Linde, then-editor-in-chief of the Jerusalem Post, during an August 24, 2014 conversation. Peres stipulated in his interview that the exchange between the two not be reported until after his death.

Former Israeli president Shimon Peres dies at 93

In 2011, Netanyahu and his defence minister Ehud Barak were actively building their case to attack Iran, saying the Islamic Republic was developing a nuclear bomb. “By next spring, at most by next summer at current enrichment rates, [Iran] will have finished the medium enrichment and move on to the final stage,” Netanyahu told the UN General Assembly in 2012. “From there, it’s only a few months, possibly a few weeks before they get enough enriched uranium for the first bomb.”

World leaders gather for funeral of Israeli ex-PM, Shimon Peres

Shimon Peres, Israeli Defence Force and members of Israel’s defence establishment opposed Netanyahu’s plans to strike Iran first. A secret cable written by Israel’s intelligence leaked that year further conveyed the dissent brewing within Netanyahu’s own establishment. Iran was “not performing the activity necessary to produce weapons,” the cable read.

The Obama administration intervened shortly after a senior official of Israel’s defence establishment visited Washington and disclosed Netanyahu’s plans to attack Iran. President Obama — who was in the initial phases of negotiating his landmark nuclear deal with Iran at the time — sent the vice chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff of the time to Israel to pressure officials not to follow through with an attack.

Abbas, Netanyahu shake hands at Peres funeral

The move left Netanyahu infuriated and contributed to the tense relationship the the two leaders continue to share to date. Netanyahu was ultimately overruled. And if what Peres said is true, he apparently did more to deter an attack on Iran than either Israel’s defence establishment or the US.

This article originally appeared on The Jerusalem Post.

Worse than hell’: Indian migrants recall Saudi nightmare

Worse than hell’: Indian migrants recall Saudi nightmare

NEW DELHI: 

They left India for Saudi Arabia with big dreams, but have returned with only harrowing tales after an oil price slump threw the economy into turmoil, leaving thousands of poor migrant labourers stranded.

The workers from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and the Philippines were left destitute, without enough money to get home or even to buy food after losing their jobs.

This week around 40 workers from the impoverished east Indian state of Bihar finally arrived home with stories of being “left to die” by their employer Saudi Oger, the once-mighty firm led by Lebanon’s billionaire former prime minister Saad Hariri.

Pakistani worker ‘commits suicide’ in Saudi Arabia

The company, which at one time had some 50,000 workers on its payroll, was hit by a drop in income from its core construction business after Saudi Arabia delayed or cancelled projects in the face of plummeting oil revenues.

“They closed down the mess (canteen) suddenly. For three days we did not have even water to drink. There was no power either,” electrician Imam Hussain told AFP after landing in New Delhi this week.

“I was even arrested because my identification documents were not renewed by my employer. The situation there was worse than hell,” said the 27-year-old, who was working on the renovation of Saudi King Salman’s palace in Riyadh.

Hussain was among millions of poor Asians working in the Gulf states, where human rights groups say many suffer exploitation and abuses with no channels for redress.

Under the kingdom’s kafala system, most foreign workers are barred from moving to a new job without their boss’s consent before their contracts end, leaving many trapped. It has been criticised by rights groups as a form of bonded labour or even slavery.

PM directs authorities to aid stranded Pakistani workers in Saudi Arabia

Hussain and his fellow migrants had spent several days in Delhi as they waited to go home to Bihar, sleeping on mattresses on the floor of a budget hotel’s garage and eating on a filthy, open terrace.

But their huge relief at coming home meant they barely noticed the discomfort.

“We are just so relieved to be back home finally. All we want is to see our family and start our lives afresh,” said Santosh Singh, a low-wage construction labourer as he waited to board a train to his native village.

Saudi Arabia is the favoured destination for Indian labourers, with nearly three million working mainly in the construction sector. A 2014 report by Amnesty said close to a thousand low-wage migrant labourers are provided clearance to travel to Saudi Arabia every day.

Bihar, which has some of the worst rates for poverty, malnutrition and life expectancy in the country, has the highest migration rates, according to a government report in 2007.

Many leave to escape an exploitation-ridden rural economy in the absence of any local enterprise or industry. Migration offers an easy opportunity to the often semi-literate workforce to earn relatively good wages abroad.

Indian minister visits Saudi to repatriate 10,000 stranded workers

“In Siwan district where I live they used to make public announcements about overseas job vacancies with the beating of the drum,” said Zakir Hussain, who went to Riyadh in 2013 and was making some Rs 30,000 per month ($450) before the problems began.

“I have 15 members in my family and it (going abroad) was my only chance at a better life.

“But look what happened. I have not been paid since December. All my dreams are shattered. I just hope I will get back my dues some day,” he said.

In August, the Indian foreign ministry stepped in to repatriate thousands of Indian migrant workers who did not even have money to buy their tickets.

The Saudi government then took action, providing food and medicine to Indians staying in camps while promising to provide free passage to all those who wanted to go back to India.

Saudi Arabia has also said it will handle legal claims of the Oger workers in an effort to get their money back. Sheikh Dilsher, who worked for Oger for 18 years, is still unable to come to terms with the sudden turn his life has taken.

“I slogged all my life for them,” he said, tears welling up his eyes. “But what did I get in return?

“All my benefits which come to some 42,000 Saudi riyal (around $11,200) have been withheld.

“I have no money and no hope now.”

India, Japan to sign nuclear cooperation deal in November: report

India, Japan to sign nuclear cooperation deal in November: report

Japan and India are likely to sign a civil nuclear cooperation pact during a visit to Japan by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in mid-November, the Mainichi newspaper reported on Saturday.

The governments of Asia’s second-and third-largest economies are leaning toward holding a summit meeting between Modi and his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe, the report said, citing unidentified diplomatic sources from both nations.

India fails to get NSG membership

The two leaders last December reached a basic agreement for cooperation in the peaceful use of nuclear energy, but they stopped short of signing the agreement, citing outstanding technical and legal differences.

Japan, the only country to have suffered a nuclear attack, has been demanding additional non-proliferation guarantees from India, which has a nuclear weapons program, before exporting nuclear reactors.

India and Japan have been negotiating the nuclear energy deal since Japan’s ally, the United States, opened the way for nuclear commerce with India, which has shunned the global Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

Pakistan apprehensive of US-India defence deal

The two countries have reached a basic agreement during the working level negotiations that Japan would halt cooperation immediately if India conducted a nuclear test, the report added.

A final deal with Japan would benefit US firms. India has already given land for nuclear plants to GE-Hitachi – which is an alliance between the US and Japanese firms – and to Toshiba’s Westinghouse Electric Company.

Backtracking: India says no helicopters used in 'surgical strikes'

Backtracking: India says no helicopters used in ‘surgical strikes’

Backtracking: India says no helicopters used in ‘surgical strikes’

Just a day after India claimed that its army carried out “surgical strikes” inside Pakistan with the support of military choppers, a senior Indian minister retracted the claim saying “these did not involve any aerial operations.”

“There were no aerial strikes,” Indian Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore, himself an ex-Indian Army man, told The Hindu during an interview.

Rathore said the Indian Army crossed the Line of Control (LoC) “on the ground” for carrying out what he termed were “pre-emptive strikes”. “That is not like crossing the international border.”

‘Surgical’ farce blows up in India’s face

On Thursday, soon after the Indian military claimed that it had carried out “surgical strikes” against perceived “terrorist launch pads” on the Pakistani side of the LoC in disputed Kashmir region, the Pakistani Army ripped to shreds the Indian farcical claim as an “illusion being deliberately generated by the Indians to create false effects”.

Rathore’s remarks appeared to endorse the version of the army’s media wing, ISPR, which insisted: “there has been no surgical strike by India, instead there had been cross-border fire initiated and conducted by India.”

While Indian media grossly exaggerated New Delhi’s claim, the Pakistani media, however, questioned its authenticity.

The Indian Express had called it a “defining moment” but said the government must now be vigilant to ensure that the “clamour for more” did not fuel an escalation in hostilities.

The Hindustan Times welcomed the strikes in an editorial headlined “Befitting response”, and said India would “take satisfaction from the revenge, served cold”.

Strategic analysts laugh off Indian claim

The Indian army provided little insight as to how the entire operation was conducted. The media there, however, said the operation was a combination of heliborne and ground forces. Special forces were para-dropped for the operation, it added. It said alleged terror launch pads targeted were in the range of 2- 3 kilometres from the LoC.

Some Indian news websites, which mentioned the use of helicopters in the operation:

source The tribune

At least 8 dead, 19 missing after China landslides: Xinhua

At least 8 dead, 19 missing after China landslides: Xinhua

BEIJING: 

At least 8 dead, 19 missing after China landslides: Xinhua

At least eight people have died and around 19 are still missing after devastating landslides swept through two eastern Chinese villages, local authorities told the official Xinhua news agency Saturday.

Heavy wind and torrential rains brought by Typhoon Medi triggered the landslides on Wednesday, burying dozens of homes from the villages of Sucun and Baofeng in Zhejiang province’s Suichang county.

More than 4,000 rescue workers with 180 diggers were scrambling to find survivors but persistent rain and poor road conditions had hindered rescue efforts, the agency reported.

Video footage of the landslide on social media showed torrents of water and rock pouring down a mountain towards houses in the valley below while terrified onlookers screamed.

Typhoon Megi had already claimed one life on Wednesday morning, when a flash flood tore through the home of a villager in the coastal province of Fujian, according to reports.

At least 2.09 million people from three provinces have been affected by the typhoon, which has destroyed roughly 1,200 houses, the People’s Daily reported Saturday.

The storm is estimated to have caused China 5.53 billion yuan ($835 million) in damages.

The typhoon smashed into Taiwan earlier in the week, leaving a trail of destruction and killing seven as it raked across the island.

It also caused an estimated Tw$1.31 billion ($42 million) in agricultural damage and left more than four million households without power.

Canada: Cumberland Ahmadiyya group donates potatoes for soldiers

Canada: Cumberland Ahmadiyya group donates potatoes for soldiers

Canada: Cumberland Ahmadiyya group donates potatoes for soldiers

“We [the mosque] bought 16 bags of potatoes to donate. We’re hoping that the next year we can plan in advance and hopefully be able to donate much more than this one.”

The Soldiers Helping Soldiers’ potato program has wrapped up for their second year, and organizers said they were able to collect 680 pounds of potatoes.

The project received a major donation, of 160 pounds of potatoes, from the Ahmadiyya Mosque in Cumberland.

Iman Imtiaz Ahmed said he was informed about the potato program through Cumberland Councillor Stephen Blais.

“I wanted to be part of this and of course the community wanted to be part of this,” said Ahmed. “But I can tell you, I tried to grow potatoes, I tried my best, I call myself a YouTube farmer, but I failed miserably unfortunately.”

Ahmed said even though growing their own potatoes didn’t work out, they still wanted to contribute.

“We [the mosque] bought 16 bags of potatoes to donate. We’re hoping that the next year we can plan in advance and hopefully be able to donate much more than this one.”

Ahmed said this was a great initiative, especially since we have many members of the community who served with the armed forces.

Soldiers Helping Soldiers is a volunteer initiative that helps homeless veterans and veterans or serving members on a trajectory to be homeless.

Read original post here: Potato program wraps up with over 600 pounds donated

India: Are Ahmadis oblivious to Islamic Radicalisation in Kerala?

India: Are Ahmadis oblivious to Islamic Radicalisation in Kerala?

India: Are Ahmadis oblivious to Islamic Radicalisation in Kerala?

Ahmadi Muslims are in a minority and persecuted everywhere, and one is left wondering if the current phase in their spiritual life represents the Mecca period of early Islam, purely non-violent.

Dr. Salahuddin is the emir of Ahmadiyya Jamaat based in Kozhikode. If one were to believe his interpretation of current affairs, there is peace everywhere and Kerala is a paradise. When coaxed to explain some conflicts among Muslims, he does open up saying: “Salafism in Kerala is not the same as Salafism in other countries. They do not support terrorism here, but due to splits in the Salafi movement, some might go the radical way.” Asked about the response of Muslims towards Ahmadis, he adds: “There is no problem faced by the community as in Pakistan, but when we go for preaching, there is some opposition based on doctrinal beliefs.” There are also occasional reports of Ahmadi Muslims being beaten up in Karnataka and Kerala.

As for Ahmadi Muslims themselves, their beliefs respect spiritual leaders of all communities. “Insofar as Ahmadi Muslim view is concerned, all persons who are held high by a community for centuries they have to be respected by all Muslims. We say Alayhi As-Salaam (peace be upon him) for Buddha, Confucius, Rama and Krishna,” Dr. Salahuddin says and stresses that even non-Ahmadi Muslims pray alongside Ahmadis in his mosque. But Ahmadi Muslims are in a minority and persecuted everywhere, and one is left wondering if the current phase in their spiritual life represents the Mecca period of early Islam, purely non-violent.

____________________
Former BBC journalist Tufail Ahmad is executive director of the Open Source Institute, New Delhi. He tweets @tufailelif

Read original post here: Perspective: The Roots of Islamic Radicalisation in Kerala | Tufail Ahmad

But victim, blaming, persists, in Mormon, purity culture,

But victim-blaming persists in Mormon purity culture

But victim-blaming persists in Mormon purity culture

Moroni 9:9 relays the story of the Lamanite daughters who were raped and deprived “of that which was dear and precious among all things, which is chastity and virtue.”

A controversial verse from the Book of Mormon that describes rape as the loss of chastity has been removed from a workbook Mormon girls are required to study.

LDS Church spokesman Eric Hawkins confirmed to The Salt Lake Tribune on Monday that the verse was recently eliminated in the English version of thePersonal Progress workbook that covers virtue.

Chapter 9 of the Book of Moroni details the “depravity” of the Lamanites ― a tribe the Book of Mormon describes as descendants of Laman and Lemuel, two brothers from a family of Israelites that sailed across the ocean around 600 BC.

Moroni 9:9 relays the story of the Lamanite daughters who were raped and deprived “of that which was dear and precious among all things, which is chastity and virtue.”

The workbook still emphasizes chastity, asking girls to write in their journal on “the promised blessings of being sexually clean and pure and your commitment to be chaste.” But the revision reflects LDS Church policy, as stated on the church’s website, which says that “victims of sexual abuse are not guilty of sin and do not need to repent.”

Mormon author Jana Reiss called the change “a good start” in an article on Religion News Service, but noted that the verse is still present in LDS scripture and pervades Mormon beliefs surrounding purity.

For years church leaders have communicated the message to Mormon faithful that it’s better to “be better dead clean than alive unclean.” This message has shifted in recent years, Reiss said in her article. But Mormon survivors of sexual assault are still often subjected to victim-blaming.

In March, a student at LDS-operated Brigham Young University filed a federal complaint against the school for putting her on academic hold after she reported being raped to police.

In other cases where students have reported sexual assault, BYU has investigated them for violations of the Honor Code, including drinking, staying out late or going into boys’ rooms, reports The Salt Lake Tribune.

Well-known activist and rape survivor Elizabeth Smart addressed the BYU Honor Code in an interview with Broadly in September. Smart discussed the “religious stigma” that can make survivors afraid to come forward with their testimonies. This culture of shaming, she said, needs to come to an end.

“People need to realize there is nothing that can detract from your worth,” Smart told Broadly. “When it comes to rape and sexual violence and abuse, that can never detract from who you are.”

Read original post here: USA: Verse That Linked Rape To Chastity Removed From Mormon Youth BookBut victim-blaming persists in Mormon purity culture.

A controversial verse from the Book of Mormon that describes rape as the loss of chastity has been removed from a workbook Mormon girls are required to study.

LDS Church spokesman Eric Hawkins confirmed to The Salt Lake Tribune on Monday that the verse was recently eliminated in the English version of thePersonal Progress workbook that covers virtue.

Chapter 9 of the Book of Moroni details the “depravity” of the Lamanites ― a tribe the Book of Mormon describes as descendants of Laman and Lemuel, two brothers from a family of Israelites that sailed across the ocean around 600 BC.

Moroni 9:9 relays the story of the Lamanite daughters who were raped and deprived “of that which was dear and precious among all things, which is chastity and virtue.”

The workbook still emphasizes chastity, asking girls to write in their journal on “the promised blessings of being sexually clean and pure and your commitment to be chaste.” But the revision reflects LDS Church policy, as stated on the church’s website, which says that “victims of sexual abuse are not guilty of sin and do not need to repent.”

Mormon author Jana Reiss called the change “a good start” in an article on Religion News Service, but noted that the verse is still present in LDS scripture and pervades Mormon beliefs surrounding purity.

For years church leaders have communicated the message to Mormon faithful that it’s better to “be better dead clean than alive unclean.” This message has shifted in recent years, Reiss said in her article. But Mormon survivors of sexual assault are still often subjected to victim-blaming.

In March, a student at LDS-operated Brigham Young University filed a federal complaint against the school for putting her on academic hold after she reported being raped to police.

In other cases where students have reported sexual assault, BYU has investigated them for violations of the Honor Code, including drinking, staying out late or going into boys’ rooms, reports The Salt Lake Tribune.

Well-known activist and rape survivor Elizabeth Smart addressed the BYU Honor Code in an interview with Broadly in September. Smart discussed the “religious stigma” that can make survivors afraid to come forward with their testimonies. This culture of shaming, she said, needs to come to an end.

“People need to realize there is nothing that can detract from your worth,” Smart told Broadly. “When it comes to rape and sexual violence and abuse, that can never detract from who you are.”

Read original post here: USA: Verse That Linked Rape To Chastity Removed From Mormon Youth Book