PPP disowns Hussain Haqqani

ISLAMABAD: The Pakistan People’s Party on Friday disowned former Pakistan ambassador to the US, Hussain Haqqani.

PPP spokesperson Farhatullah Babar, in a statement, said his party does not agree with Haqqani’s opinion or analysis and connecting his work with the PPP is wrong.

Reacting to the PPP spokesperson’s statement, Hussain Haqqani, in a series of tweets said he is glad and he can now focus on research and writing without having to worry about ties to the PPP or its policies.

“Political parties cannot be expected to own scholarly research or analysis just as scholarly work cannot be constrained by party policies,” said the former diplomat.

He, however, reminded PPP about his services to the party by saying that he joined the party’s slain leader Benazir Bhutto in 1993 and stood by her and her husband, Asif Ali Zardari in tough times.

“That political contribution to Pakistani politics is sufficient,” said Haqqani.

Source DawnNews

Petition for PM’s disqualification

Imran Khan announced that his party has filed a reference with the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) seeking Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s disqualification for not declaring his actual assets to the commission.

The petition was filed by the party leader Dr Yasmeen Rashid.

“Nawaz Sharif has been breaking Pakistan’s laws since his term began, but no one has taken action against them, we are trying to make him obey the law,” said Imran Khan while announcing the development.

The Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) had earlier announced their decision to file petitions against the disqualification of PM and his family members in ECP.

Source Dawnnews

Sanders says he’ll vote for Clinton

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders said on Friday he will vote for presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Asked if he would vote for Clinton in November, Sanders told MSNBC television: “Yes. The issue right here is I’m going to do everything I can to defeat Donald Trump. I think Trump in so many ways would be a disaster if he were elected president.” Clinton clinched the party nomination earlier in June.

While Sanders had said he would work with Clinton to defeat Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, he had yet to endorse Clinton and has kept his own election campaign alive

Source (Dawnnews)

Indian troops kill seven Kashmiri youth in Kupwara

ISLAMABAD: Indian troops in Indian-held Kashmir have shot dead seven Kashmiri youth on Friday in the Kupwara district.

The troops killed the youth during the ongoing military operations at Dhobiwan Khurhama, Dragmulla and Wuder Bala areas of the district since yesterday.

The military operations continued till reports last came in, reported KMS.

Indian army claimed that the youth were militants and were killed in encounters with the troops.

People took to the streets at Wuder Bala and staged forceful demonstrations against the killing of the youth. Indian forces shot at and used tear gas to disperse the protesters.

Earlier, the Indian Army killed a budding cricketer, Nayeem Bhatt in April. The student of Government Degree College Handwara, was killed when the Indian troops opened fire to disperse a stone-pelting mob which was protesting against alleged molestation of a girl in the town.

A complete shutdown is being observed in Maisuma area of Srinagar against the continued illegal detention of the Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front Chairman, Mohammad Yasin Malik.

source Dawnnews

Trump hails Brexit vote on visit to Scotland

TURNBERRY: Donald Trump hailed Britain’s vote to leave the EU as “fantastic” shortly after arriving in Scotland on Friday for his first international trip since becoming the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

“I think it’s a great thing. I think it’s a fantastic thing,” he told reporters.

Ahead of his visit, Trump had told Fox News that he felt Britain should “go it alone” and leave the 28-member EU in a move that could shape the continent.

Trump swooped down by helicopter into his Trump Turnberry golf course, where a large Scottish flag flew in front of the picturesque seafront, as protesters gathered nearby.

The visit is brief, long enough to cut the ribbon on a refurbishment of his golf course, returning to the US presidential campaign by Saturday.

The New York celebrity tycoon has caused alarm in Europe with his abrasive style and pledges to deport millions of undocumented immigrants and build a wall on the border with Mexico.

His proposal to ban Muslims from entering the United States drew the ire of Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron, who called the idea “stupid, divisive and wrong”.

His main rival for the presidential vote in November, Hillary Clinton, seized the moment to post a video compilation of criticism from Cameron and others.

“People in Scotland are not thrilled about Trump coming to their country,” Clinton posted on Twitter. “We know the feeling.”

‘Not welcome’

Two groups, Scotland Against Trump and Stand Up To Racism Scotland bussed protesters to the golf resort to picket the property mogul.

“Scotland is a progressive, tolerant and multicultural country and we oppose the bigotry that Donald Trump represents,” Keir McKechnie of Stand Up To Racism Scotland told AFP.

“We want to tell the world that he’s not welcome here.”

Jonathon Shafi of Scotland Against Trump said he wanted the gathering to demonstrate unity with protesters in the US that have disrupted Trump rallies.

“We want to send a message of solidarity to movements like Black Lives Matter that we are united in opposition,” Shafi told AFP.

On Saturday, Trump is expected to travel to the Trump International Golf Links, his course in the eastern coastal village of Balmedie, a resort that has been controversial with locals.

Some irate neighbours living next to the course have raised Mexican flags in symbolic opposition to Trump.

The trip is in a starkly different atmosphere than a visit to Germany by Barack Obama in 2008, when the US president was the presumptive Democratic nominee.

Obama addressed a crowd of tens of thousands about his hopes of closer links to a unified Europe.

Trump has criticised the continent’s leaders as “weak”, and accused them of inadequate measures to combat terrorism after attacks in Brussels this year.

Source (Dawn News)

Massive fire three points in Karachi’s industrial area

KARACHI: Massive fire engulfed three points in Karachi’s industrial area Friday, DawnNews reported.

Firefighters were busy controlling the fire that broke out in a chemical factory in the city’s Site Area and in a tyre factory near Gulbai.

Fire officials declared it a third-degree fire. However, no loss of human life was reported.

Sindh Chief Minister Syed Qaim Ali Shah took notice of the incident and directed Karachi’s commissioner to utilise all available resources at hand to control the fire.

According to DawnNews, firefighting department officials have asked for all fire brigades in the city to reach the Industrial Area immediately.

It was still unclear what the cause of the fire was, with officials stating that the reason can only be determined after an investigation into the matter is conducted.

Last night, a massive fire broke out in a pharmaceutical company near Hawkesbay and eight fire brigade vehicles were called in to control it.

Fire officials said short circuit caused the fire to erupt and that before it was extinguished, medicines worth millions of rupees were destroyed.

Source DawnNews

A masked man was shot dead in Germany

BERLIN: A masked man was shot dead Thursday after entering a movie theater in southwestern Germany with a weapon and taking several hostages, authorities said. No one else was injured.

German public TV initially said 25 people were injured, but it wasn’t clear if they were shot or hurt in other ways.

An armed man entered the Kinopolis movie theater in the early afternoon in the town of Viernheim and apparently fired a gun, police spokesman Bernd Hochstaedter told n-tv television.

Police shot the suspect dead about three hours later, Hesse Interior Minister Peter Beuth said.

“We believe that there were no injured people, and that the people who were in the cinema with the perpetrator could be freed uninjured,” he said.

A police spokeswoman at the scene, Christiane Kompus, told The Associated Press that she had no information on the assailant’s identity and motives. She said the man had been holding several hostages, but didn’t have a precise number.

Beuth said it wasn’t clear whether the weapon was real. He told the regional legislature in Wiesbaden that the man was masked and that apparently four shots were fired.

Beuth said the man had given a confused impression, news agency dpa reported.

Source (Dawn News)

Tears, fears and a resignation as Britain exits EU

Tears, fears and a resignation as Britain exits EU

As over 52 per cent of Britons voted on Thursday to leave the European Union on Thursday.

British Prime Minister David Cameron, who had campaigned against the Brexit, announced his resignation on Friday following the ‘Leave’ vote even as he promised to try to “steady the ship” before he formally steps down in October.

The UK now has two years to negotiate terms of exit from the bloc.

Supporters of the 'Stronger In' Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London on June 23, 2016. Bookmakers dramatically reversed the odds on Britain leaving the European Union on Friday as early results from a historic referendum pointed to strong support for a Brexit. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Supporters of the ‘Stronger In’ Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London on June 23, 2016.

A neon sign for the 2016 referendum is attached to the doors of the announcement hall in Manchester Town Hall , northwest England on June 23, 2016 where the final result of a referendum on whether the UK will remain or stay in the European Union (EU) will be announced. Britain has voted to leave the European Union by 52 percent to 48 percent, the BBC reported on Friday, after nearly all the results had been counted. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Rob Stothard

A neon sign for the 2016 referendum is attached to the doors of the announcement hall in Manchester Town Hall , northwest England on June 23, 2016 where the final result of a referendum on whether the UK will remain or stay in the European Union (EU) will be announced.
Britain has voted to leave the European Union by 52 percent to 48 percent, the BBC reported on Friday, after nearly all the results had been counted. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Rob Stothard

An illuminated "In or Out" sign is pictured outside a house in Hangleton near Brighton in southern England, on June 23, 2016, as Britain holds a referendum on whether to stay or leave the European Union (EU). Millions of Britons began voting Thursday in a bitterly-fought, knife-edge referendum that could tear up the island nation's EU membership and spark the greatest emergency of the bloc's 60-year history. / AFP PHOTO / GLYN KIRK

An illuminated “In or Out” sign is pictured outside a house in Hangleton near Brighton in southern England, on June 23, 2016, as Britain holds a referendum on whether to stay or leave the European Union (EU).
Millions of Britons began voting Thursday in a bitterly-fought, knife-edge referendum that could tear up the island nation’s EU membership and spark the greatest emergency of the bloc’s 60-year history. / AFP PHOTO / GLYN KIRK

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks after Britain voted to leave the European Union, outside Number 10 Downing Street as his wife Samantha looks on in London, Britain June 24, 2016. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron speaks after Britain voted to leave the European Union, outside Number 10 Downing Street as his wife Samantha looks on in London, Britain June 24, 2016. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

Supporters of the Stronger In Campaign gather to wait for the result of the EU referendum at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London on June 23, 2016. The first mainland result declared in Britain's historic EU referendum on Thursday gave a very slender lead to the campaign to stay in the bloc, but was much closer than expected, an expert said. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Supporters of the Stronger In Campaign gather to wait for the result of the EU referendum at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London on June 23, 2016.
The first mainland result declared in Britain’s historic EU referendum on Thursday gave a very slender lead to the campaign to stay in the bloc, but was much closer than expected, an expert said. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

A man looks at his computer screen showing the Brexit live poll and realtime GBP / HKD rates on during a live broadcast of the Brexit vote results in Hong Kong on June 24, 2016. Britain has voted to break out of the European Union, national media declared on June 24, striking a thunderous blow against the bloc and spreading alarm through markets as sterling plummeted to a 31-year low against the dollar. / AFP PHOTO / ANTHONY WALLACE

A man looks at his computer screen showing the Brexit live poll and realtime GBP / HKD rates on during a live broadcast of the Brexit vote results in Hong Kong on June 24, 2016.
Britain has voted to break out of the European Union, national media declared on June 24, striking a thunderous blow against the bloc and spreading alarm through markets as sterling plummeted to a 31-year low against the dollar. / AFP PHOTO / ANTHONY WALLACE

Traders from BGC, a global brokerage company in London's Canary Wharf financial centre react as European stock markets open early June 24, 2016 after Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU BREXIT referendum. REUTERS/Russell Boyce

Traders from BGC, a global brokerage company in London’s Canary Wharf financial centre react as European stock markets open early June 24, 2016 after Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU BREXIT referendum. REUTERS/Russell Boyce

Staff count ballot papers at the Glasgow count centre at the Emirates Arena, Glasgow, Scotland, on June 23, 2016 after polls closed in the referendum on whether the UK will remain or stay in the European Union (EU). Millions of Britons began voting Thursday in a bitterly-fought, knife-edge referendum that could tear up the island nation's EU membership and spark the greatest emergency of the bloc's 60-year history. / AFP PHOTO / Robert Perry

Staff count ballot papers at the Glasgow count centre at the Emirates Arena, Glasgow, Scotland, on June 23, 2016 after polls closed in the referendum on whether the UK will remain or stay in the European Union (EU).
Millions of Britons began voting Thursday in a bitterly-fought, knife-edge referendum that could tear up the island nation’s EU membership and spark the greatest emergency of the bloc’s 60-year history. / AFP PHOTO / Robert Perry

Members of the press wait outside Downing street in central London on June 23, 2016 following the EU referendum. Britain has voted to leave the European Union by 52 percent to 48 percent, the BBC reported on Friday, after nearly all the results had been counted. / AFP PHOTO / ODD ANDERSEN

Members of the press wait outside Downing street in central London on June 23, 2016 following the EU referendum.
Britain has voted to leave the European Union by 52 percent to 48 percent, the BBC reported on Friday, after nearly all the results had been counted. / AFP PHOTO / ODD ANDERSEN

Count staff check and verify ballot papers at the Glasgow count centre at the Emirates Arena, Glasgow, Scotland, on June 23, 2016 after polls closed in the referendum on whether the UK will remain or stay in the European Union (EU). Millions of Britons began voting Thursday in a bitterly-fought, knife-edge referendum that could tear up the island nation's EU membership and spark the greatest emergency of the bloc's 60-year history. / AFP PHOTO / Robert Perry

Count staff check and verify ballot papers at the Glasgow count centre at the Emirates Arena, Glasgow, Scotland, on June 23, 2016 after polls closed in the referendum on whether the UK will remain or stay in the European Union (EU).
Millions of Britons began voting Thursday in a bitterly-fought, knife-edge referendum that could tear up the island nation’s EU membership and spark the greatest emergency of the bloc’s 60-year history. / AFP PHOTO / Robert Perry

Former London Mayor and Vote Leave campaigner Boris Johnson (L) and his wife Marina Wheeler pose for the media outside a polling station in north London on June 23, 2016, as he casts his vote in a national referendum on whether to remain in, or to leave the European Union (EU). Millions of Britons began voting Thursday in a bitterly-fought, knife-edge referendum that could tear up the island nation's EU membership and spark the greatest emergency of the bloc's 60-year history. / AFP PHOTO / ODD ANDERSEN

Former London Mayor and Vote Leave campaigner Boris Johnson (L) and his wife Marina Wheeler pose for the media outside a polling station in north London on June 23, 2016, as he casts his vote in a national referendum on whether to remain in, or to leave the European Union (EU).
Millions of Britons began voting Thursday in a bitterly-fought, knife-edge referendum that could tear up the island nation’s EU membership and spark the greatest emergency of the bloc’s 60-year history. / AFP PHOTO / ODD ANDERSEN

A Scottish bagpiper plays outside the house of former London Mayor and Vote Leave campaigner Boris Johnson in London on June 24, 2016. Britain has voted to break out of the European Union, striking a thunderous blow against the bloc and spreading panic through world markets Friday as sterling collapsed to a 31-year low. / AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS

A Scottish bagpiper plays outside the house of former London Mayor and Vote Leave campaigner Boris Johnson in London on June 24, 2016.
Britain has voted to break out of the European Union, striking a thunderous blow against the bloc and spreading panic through world markets Friday as sterling collapsed to a 31-year low. / AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS

Vote counting staff sort ballot papers at a vote counting centre at The Royal Horticultural Halls in central London on June 23, 2016. Voting has ended in Thursday's historic British referendum on EU membership, with the final opinion poll pointing to a slender victory for the "Remain" campaign. / AFP PHOTO / NIKLAS HALLE'N

Vote counting staff sort ballot papers at a vote counting centre at The Royal Horticultural Halls in central London on June 23, 2016.
Voting has ended in Thursday’s historic British referendum on EU membership, with the final opinion poll pointing to a slender victory for the “Remain” campaign.
/ AFP PHOTO / NIKLAS HALLE’N

Jenny Watson, Chairperson of the United Kingdom Electoral Commission announces the overall outcome of the EU referendum at the Manchester Town Hall in Manchester, northern England on June 24, 2016. Britain has voted to break out of the European Union, striking a thunderous blow against the bloc and spreading panic through world markets Friday as sterling collapsed to a 31-year low. / AFP PHOTO / Lindsey Parnaby

Jenny Watson, Chairperson of the United Kingdom Electoral Commission announces the overall outcome of the EU referendum at the Manchester Town Hall in Manchester, northern England on June 24, 2016.
Britain has voted to break out of the European Union, striking a thunderous blow against the bloc and spreading panic through world markets Friday as sterling collapsed to a 31-year low. / AFP PHOTO / Lindsey Parnaby

Conservative MP, Nigel Evans (R) and fellow pro-Leave campaigners cheer as results swing in their favour at the Manchester Town Hall in Manchester, north west England early in the morning of June 24, 2016. First results from Britain's historic EU referendum suggest an extremely tight race, with swathes of northern England backing "Leave" but parts of London and Scotland coming out strongly for "Remain". / AFP PHOTO / Lindsey PARNABY

Conservative MP, Nigel Evans (R) and fellow pro-Leave campaigners cheer as results swing in their favour at the Manchester Town Hall in Manchester, north west England early in the morning of June 24, 2016.
First results from Britain’s historic EU referendum suggest an extremely tight race, with swathes of northern England backing “Leave” but parts of London and Scotland coming out strongly for “Remain”.
/ AFP PHOTO / Lindsey PARNABY

Leader of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP), Nigel Farage reacts at the Leave.EU referendum party at Millbank Tower in central London on June 24, 2016, as results indicate that it looks likely the UK will leave the European Union (EU). Top anti-EU campaigner Nigel Farage said he was increasingly confident of victory in Britain's EU referendum on Friday, voicing hope that the result "brings down" the European Union. / AFP PHOTO / GEOFF CADDICK

Leader of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP), Nigel Farage reacts at the Leave.EU referendum party at Millbank Tower in central London on June 24, 2016, as results indicate that it looks likely the UK will leave the European Union (EU).
Top anti-EU campaigner Nigel Farage said he was increasingly confident of victory in Britain’s EU referendum on Friday, voicing hope that the result “brings down” the European Union. / AFP PHOTO / GEOFF CADDICK

Supporters of the 'Stronger In' Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London early in the morning of June 24, 2016. Bookmakers dramatically reversed the odds on Britain leaving the European Union on Friday as early results from a historic referendum pointed to strong support for a Brexit. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Supporters of the ‘Stronger In’ Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London early in the morning of June 24, 2016.
Bookmakers dramatically reversed the odds on Britain leaving the European Union on Friday as early results from a historic referendum pointed to strong support for a Brexit. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Leave.EU supporters wave Union flags and cheer as the results come in at the Leave.EU referendum party at Millbank Tower in central London early in the morning of June 24, 2016. First results from Britain's knife-edge referendum showed unexpectedly strong support for leaving the European Union on Friday, sending the pound plummeting as investors feared a historic blow against the 28-nation alliance. / AFP PHOTO / GEOFF CADDICK

Leave.EU supporters wave Union flags and cheer as the results come in at the Leave.EU referendum party at Millbank Tower in central London early in the morning of June 24, 2016.
First results from Britain’s knife-edge referendum showed unexpectedly strong support for leaving the European Union on Friday, sending the pound plummeting as investors feared a historic blow against the 28-nation alliance. / AFP PHOTO / GEOFF CADDICK

Supporters of the 'Stronger In' Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London early in the morning of June 24, 2016. Bookmakers dramatically reversed the odds on Britain leaving the European Union on Friday as early results from a historic referendum pointed to strong support for a Brexit. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Supporters of the ‘Stronger In’ Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London early in the morning of June 24, 2016.
Bookmakers dramatically reversed the odds on Britain leaving the European Union on Friday as early results from a historic referendum pointed to strong support for a Brexit. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Pro-Leave campaigners watch TV screens as results begin to come in at the Manchester Central Convention Complex where the EU referendum vote count is taking place in Manchester, north west England on June 23, 2016. First results from Britain's historic EU referendum suggest an extremely tight race, with swathes of northern England backing "Leave" but parts of London and Scotland coming out strongly for "Remain". / AFP PHOTO / Lindsey PARNABY

Pro-Leave campaigners watch TV screens as results begin to come in at the Manchester Central Convention Complex where the EU referendum vote count is taking place in Manchester, north west England on June 23, 2016.
First results from Britain’s historic EU referendum suggest an extremely tight race, with swathes of northern England backing “Leave” but parts of London and Scotland coming out strongly for “Remain”.
/ AFP PHOTO / Lindsey PARNABY

Supporters of the 'Stronger In' Campaign watch the results of the EU referendum being announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London on June 24, 2016. Britain's economy was plunged into a dizzying unknown on Friday as the country lurched towards the EU exit, with the world economy bracing for a hit on growth and unemployment. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Supporters of the ‘Stronger In’ Campaign watch the results of the EU referendum being announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London on June 24, 2016.
Britain’s economy was plunged into a dizzying unknown on Friday as the country lurched towards the EU exit, with the world economy bracing for a hit on growth and unemployment. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Supporters of the 'Stronger In' Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London early in the morning of June 24, 2016. Bookmakers dramatically reversed the odds on Britain leaving the European Union on Friday as early results from a historic referendum pointed to strong support for a Brexit. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Supporters of the ‘Stronger In’ Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London early in the morning of June 24, 2016.
Bookmakers dramatically reversed the odds on Britain leaving the European Union on Friday as early results from a historic referendum pointed to strong support for a Brexit. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / ROB STOTHARD

Supporters of the Stronger In Campaign watch the results of the EU referendum being announced at the Royal Festival Hall on June 24, 2016 in London Britain has voted to break out of the European Union, national media declared today, striking a thunderous blow against the bloc and spreading alarm through markets as sterling plummeted to a 31-year low against the dollar. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Rob Stothard

Supporters of the Stronger In Campaign watch the results of the EU referendum being announced at the Royal Festival Hall on June 24, 2016 in London
Britain has voted to break out of the European Union, national media declared today, striking a thunderous blow against the bloc and spreading alarm through markets as sterling plummeted to a 31-year low against the dollar. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Rob Stothard

A trader from BGC Partners, a global brokerage company in London's Canary Wharf financial centre waits for European stock markets to open early June 24, 2016 after Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU BREXIT referendum. REUTERS/Russell Boyce TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

A trader from BGC Partners, a global brokerage company in London’s Canary Wharf financial centre waits for European stock markets to open early June 24, 2016 after Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU BREXIT referendum. REUTERS/Russell Boyce TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

A photographer takes pictures of traders before the opening of the German stock exchange in front of the empty DAX board, at the stock exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, June 24, 2016 after Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU BREXIT referendum. REUTERS/Staff/Remote

A photographer takes pictures of traders before the opening of the German stock exchange in front of the empty DAX board, at the stock exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, June 24, 2016 after Britain voted to leave the European Union in the EU BREXIT referendum. REUTERS/Staff/Remote

Source (Dawn News)